Allotment

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Re: Allotment

#101 Post by Ex-Ascot » Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:34 am

Just done a walk around. I think we can forget the rape it is a disaster. Summat is eating it. Correction, HAS eaten it. Think that we will try carrots again there and make sure my idiot doesn't wash all the seeds out again. The big toms from Amorgos are doing well. Squashes are growing loads of leaves but few flowers, maybe too much fertilizer. May have mentioned before but you can actually use the young leaves like spinach, found this out from the housekeeper who asked for some. The birds are digging up the potatoes. Bell peppers OK no flowers yet. Bananas flourishing. Tonnes of lemons but still no sign of any oranges. Same with the clementines. It is difficult here. I can see why all our fruit and veg comes from S.A. Mind you probably not as difficult as in the Great White North. We can grow 12 months a year in this location on the lagoon which keeps us frost free in the winter.

We actually have an enormous fruit and veg garden up the river from here called the Okavango Delta. Bushmen can live there on just what is growing naturally. And, treat all their ailments from natural herbs. It is absolutely fascinating to go walking with them. Practically every plant or tree has a use.
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Re: Allotment

#102 Post by Tall Bird » Wed Oct 31, 2018 6:44 pm

I'm very impressed with the before and after digging n'planting pics of your allotment om. All the effort was well rewarded.

Re your post #87 Mr Fox, I am pleased to see you kept up with the weeding! :-*

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Re: Allotment

#103 Post by om15 » Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:46 am

Have discussed a further plot with the allotment lady, she is going to find out who is renewing and who isn't before allocating a plot in the vicinity of my present area. The available derelict plots are overgrown, covered in tyres, plastic, old pallets and in one case needs the branches of an overhanging tree loping off, so good fun times ahead.
Current plot is still producing leeks, brussel sprouts,parsnips and winter cabbage, have manure ready for digging in later on, will get some bin liners of seaweed after the winter storms as a boost for the spring planting. We are forecast a week or so of rain which will help, it is amazing that we managed to grow anything with the summer that we have just had.
I have grown several dozen good strong foxglove plants which I have introduced to the allotment, planting in the hedges and sides of the pathways, these will soon establish and return every year I hope.
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Re: Allotment

#104 Post by G-CPTN » Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:49 am

om15 wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:46 am
I have grown several dozen good strong foxglove plants which I have introduced to the allotment, planting in the hedges and sides of the pathways, these will soon establish and return every year I hope.
You will be popular as foxgloves seem to thrive and persist . . .

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Re: Allotment

#105 Post by om15 » Sun Nov 04, 2018 12:21 pm

This particular allotment is not council owned, these allotments are notorious for the rules and regulations that make life so tedious, however ours is in a beautiful country side setting and was owned by the Crown, now owned by a large multi national estate. We don't appear to have any security of tenure, however we could be difficult to dislodge,(ex servicemen eking out their meagre pensions and so on) in general we are left to our own devices, including our choice of not to have any rules.
Allotments tend to thrive in cities, where there are large waiting lists of people anxious to find some peace and a chance to be in the open air, allotments are not so sought after in villages, most country people have large gardens and prefer to eat takeawy food.
Because of this our allotment has attracted quite a cross section of people who are keen to enjoy the plots, there is no waiting list and all are encouraged to make of it what they want. Some are conventional gardeners, some use the space for growing prize winning flowers, carnations and the like, and there is a small core of organic enthusiasts whose plots can only be navigated with a machete.
My fellow allotment holders include a guy who makes golf courses in the desert for Arabs, an ex farmer, a retired RN Captain who is now following a second career, retired agricultural workers and so on, makes for interesting conversations, I think that all will be pleased to enjoy foxgloves, we shall see.
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Re: Allotment

#106 Post by Tall Bird » Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:16 am

om15 wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:46 am
Current plot is still producing leeks, brussel sprouts,parsnips and winter cabbage
Keep close watch on yer sprouts om. There may be rustlers about. OTH you may make a killing on the black market come Christmas. :D
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/0 ... lton-beef/

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Re: Allotment

#107 Post by G-CPTN » Thu Nov 08, 2018 12:58 pm

Having spent time living in an agricultural settlement in rural Bedfordshire, the Christmas sprout harvest was a major 'all hands' event, usually performed in freezing and / or torrential wet weather with the workers dressed like deep-sea trawlermen in full waterproofs.
Even so it was far from pleasant on the hands.

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