SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#721 Post by Boac » Sat Aug 07, 2021 2:52 pm

SN20 now back in the paint shop.

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#722 Post by Boac » Wed Aug 11, 2021 1:28 pm

Looks now as if BN4 is also going back - to have some 'go faster' stripes fitted?

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#723 Post by Boac » Sun Aug 15, 2021 1:38 pm

Rather mysteriously, BN3 has been circumcised.

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#724 Post by OFSO » Mon Aug 16, 2021 11:58 am

Boeing's capsule back at the factory. Oxidiser tank valves sticking, have to be replaced.

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#725 Post by Boac » Mon Aug 16, 2021 1:38 pm

Coming back as 'Starliner Max' I guess?

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#726 Post by Woody » Thu Aug 19, 2021 2:49 pm

Hopefully the mods are better than this :-o

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/trav ... heels.html
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Chop Suey....

#727 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Mon Aug 30, 2021 5:04 pm

SpaceX will attempt to catch a massive rocket using “robot chopsticks”, according to Elon Musk.

chopsui.JPG

The audacious plan could be carried out later this year during a major test of the Mars-bound Starship craft, which will see it blasted into orbit by a Super Heavy booster rocket.

The so-called chopsticks refer to mechanical arms attached to SpaceX’s launch tower – named ‘Mechazilla’ by Mr Musk – which will help guide the booster rocket back down onto the pad.

This system could eventually allow for rapid reusability and allow for multiple Starship launches in a single day, though chances of early success are far from guaranteed.

“SpaceX will try to catch largest ever flying object with robot chopsticks,” Mr Musk tweeted on Monday. “Success is not guaranteed, but excitement is.”

In a series of subsequent tweets, the SpaceX boss said the robotic arms will be equipped with tank tracks in order to “slide” the booster back out to line up with the orbital pad.

There have been several high-altitude Starship tests this year – all without the booster attached. All but one of them ended in fiery explosions.


SpaceX briefly assembled the biggest ever rocket at its Starbase facility in Boca Chica, Texas, earlier this month, demonstrating the scale of the fully stacked Starship craft.

The two segments – the Super Heavy booster rocket on the bottom and the Starship craft on the top – measured roughly 120m (400ft) when connected together.

SpaceX is yet to set a date for the next major test of its Starship prototype, which will see it fly from Texas to Hawaii in a 90-minute flight, though it is expected to take place within the coming weeks or months.
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-styl ... 11138.html
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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#728 Post by PHXPhlyer » Tue Sep 07, 2021 7:54 pm

Phoenix teacher just days away from going to space with historic Space X 'Inspiration4'

https://www.azfamily.com/news/phoenix-t ... _id=997199

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5 ) - We are now just days away from the first ever all-civilian mission to space, and part of that four-person crew is a Phoenix teacher who has waited her whole life to go to space.

Space X's Inspiration4 will make history launching into space next week. The countdown to their flight is now the focus of a new docuseries on Netflix, including how Phoenix's own Dr. Sian Proctor was chosen to be one of the astronauts. Proctor can do it all - she's a teacher, she's been in space simulation experiments, and what won her the "prosperity" seat in the Inspiration4 was her poetry and art.

Arizona’s Family caught up with her right after she learned she was selected. “It was very emotional when I found out. I kind of reference it to when Harry Potter finds out he’s a wizard and he’s like wait, I can’t be a wizard! You picked me!” Proctor said.

Proctor has been working up to this for decades. “My only fear was that this moment was never going to come or happen for me,” she told us after she was selected.

Arizona’s Family first met Proctor and her friend Erin Bonilla before the pandemic, when they were heading to Hawaii to live in a Mars simulator to study effects on the body. Proctor was already making history then.

“Seven years ago, going from the very first crew to now being a crew that’s all female is very exciting,” she told us then.

Sian Proctor and Erin Bonilla are analog astronauts

Proctor barely missed the cut to be a NASA astronaut in 2009. Space is in her blood. She was born in Guam because her dad worked with a NASA contractor on the Apollo mission.

Now just days before the Space X launch, we’re seeing those behind-the-scenes moments in the Netflix documentary 'Countdown: Inspiration4 Mission to Space' that Bonilla was a part of.

“Once she found out she was selected she was able to tell somebody about it. And I was the person she could tell during that time,” Bonilla said. “It was a really emotional moment as you can tell in the documentary, but it’s been years coming for her.” Bonilla is heading to Florida on Wednesday to be with Proctor and the crew and will be there in person for the historic launch. “It’ll be pretty awesome to be there with everybody to see it launch, and to know that there’s somebody we all know and love on that rocket is going to be pretty amazing,” Bonilla said.

Sian Proctor will be the 4th African American woman to ever be in space. This mission is also raising hundreds of millions of dollars for cancer research for St. Jude. The launch is set for Wednesday September 15.

Nothing on SpaceX website...but :-?

SpaceX's private Inspiration4 mission is 'go' for launch on Sept. 15

SpaceX and the Inspiration4 team completed the flight readiness reviews on Sept. 2.






CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX's first all-civilian launch is officially "go" for launch.

"#Inspiration4 and @SpaceX have completed our flight readiness review and remain on track for launch!" the Inspiration4 mission team tweeted on Friday (Sept. 3).

The mission, called Inspiration4, is set to blast off from NASA's Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Sept. 15. A crew of four private citizens will strap into a Crew Dragon spacecraft and blast off on a three-day journey around the Earth.

Billionaire Jared Issacman, founder of Shift4 Payments, purchased the flight as part of an effort to raise millions for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. He is joined by Haley Arceneaux, Sian Proctor and Chris Sembroski.

Arceneaux, a childhood bone cancer survivor and St. Jude physician's assistant, was chosen to represent the charity, while Proctor and Sembroski were selected as part of a global contest for a trip on the flight.

The group has been busy the last few months training for their flight. On Friday (Sept. 3), those efforts have paid off as teams from both SpaceX and Inspiration4 officially greenlit the flight.

In this artist's visualization, you can see SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft modified with a cupola observation window for the upcoming Inspiration4 mission.

In this artist's visualization, you can see SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft modified with a cupola observation window for the upcoming Inspiration4 mission. (Image credit: SpaceX)
Both the Dragon crew capsule and Falcon 9 rocket have flown before and are cleared to fly after teams thoroughly reviewed each of the crafts' systems as well as ground support system data from the launch pad.

Liftoff is expected on Sept. 15, with a backup launch date of Sept. 16, Inspiration4 officials said in a statement emailed to Space.com.

The exact liftoff time will be determined just a few days before launch. Three days before liftoff, the team will narrow the 24-hour launch window down to five hours, taking into account the weather conditions at the launch site, the flight trajectory and at potential emergency landing sites off the Florida coast.

Once in orbit, the crew will circle the Earth for three days before splashing down in the Atlantic ocean. Since the Dragon will stay free-flying in orbit and not visit the International Space Station, as previous Crew Dragon missions have done, its docking port was removed and replaced with a dome window.

The window, inspired by the Cupola on the International Space Station, will provide the crew with incredible views of Earth, according to the Inspiration4 team.

Issacman, Arceneaux, Proctor and Sembrowski are set to arrive at Kennedy Space Center on Sept. 9, ahead of their planned launch.

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#729 Post by Boac » Tue Sep 14, 2021 8:26 pm

SpaceX put 51 Starlinks into a semi-polar orbit yesterday (and, boring as it is, then landed the second booster to fly 10 missions on a barge - and, ho-hum, only the 90th successful such.) This was the first launch from the west coast of the USA for which the barge had positioned through the Panama.

Not forgetting the launch tomorrow of the first 'customer-crewed' orbital Dragon flight.

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#730 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Wed Sep 15, 2021 4:40 am

Boac wrote:
Tue Sep 14, 2021 8:26 pm
SpaceX put 51 Starlinks into a semi-polar orbit yesterday (and, boring as it is, then landed the second booster to fly 10 missions on a barge - and, ho-hum, only the 90th successful such.) This was the first launch from the west coast of the USA for which the barge had positioned through the Panama.

Not forgetting the launch tomorrow of the first 'customer-crewed' orbital Dragon flight.
Canal? Hat? ;)))

tusk.jpg
tusk.jpg (12.2 KiB) Viewed 57 times

While Elon Tusk continues to pollute LEO with his wretched constellation of Starlink debris, and light pollution, I can confirm that the Woz is looking to clean up the mess!
The big picture: Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has joined forces with former Apple engineer Alex Fielding to launch a private space company. Based on what little we know about the company thus far, it seems as if the startup is all about space sustainability.

Privateer Space aims to keep space safe and accessible to all humankind. In a teaser video on YouTube, the firm mentions “taking care of what we have so the next generation can be better together.” In announcing the startup on Twitter, Wozniak said the company will be “unlike the others.”

So, what does it all mean?

Taken at face value, one could assume that this is simply another private space company in the same category as Blue Origin, Virgin Galactic or SpaceX. But, the wording used in the video and Wozniak’s own admission that it’s unlike the others seems to suggest otherwise.

On Twitter, Fielding said he was thrilled to be part of the AMOS conference in Hawaii this week. For the uninitiated, the AMOS conference is described as the top scientific conference in the field of space situational awareness / space domain awareness. Indeed, seems that Privateer Space is all about space sustainability.

In a press release from August, a company called Desktop Metal referenced Privateer Space, calling it a satellite company focused on monitoring and cleaning up objects in space.

Wozniak and Fielding have worked together previously. Back in 2002, the two founded a company called Wheels of Zeus that developed GPS-based tracking tags. The firm’s tech was licensed by Motorola in 2004 but the company shut down a couple of years later and sold its assets to ZonTrak.

The AMOS conference runs from September 14 through the 17th in Maui.
https://www.techspot.com/news/91224-ste ... space.html

Depressed, feeling a slump, then remember Lift = Coefficient of Lift x 1/2 x ρ x V-squared X S!

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#731 Post by PHXPhlyer » Wed Sep 15, 2021 1:43 pm

SpaceX set to launch first all-civilian crew into orbit
The three-day expedition will be the first mission to space without any professional astronauts on board.


https://www.nbcnews.com/science/space/s ... t-rcna1992

Four private citizens are set to launch into orbit Wednesday in what will be the first mission to space without any professional astronauts on board.

The all-civilian crew will ride to space aboard a rocket and capsule developed by SpaceX. The mission, dubbed Inspiration4, is just the latest milestone flight in what has been a busy year for private spaceflight companies, following joyrides to suborbital space by billionaire entrepreneurs Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos over the summer.

Another billionaire, Jared Isaacman, is set to lead the historic all-civilian mission. Isaacman, the 38-year-old founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments, a Pennsylvania-based payment processing company, paid an unspecified amount for the three-day expedition in SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule.

The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Wednesday atop a reusable Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The five-hour launch window opens at 8:02 p.m. EDT, and SpaceX is planning to broadcast the event live. Forecasts currently project a 70 percent chance of favorable weather conditions for the evening launch.

The Crew Dragon capsule will spend three days circling Earth before re-entering the atmosphere and splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Florida, according to SpaceX.

“From the start of this mission, I’ve been very aware of how fortunate we are to be part of this history SpaceX is creating right now,” Isaacman said Tuesday in a preflight briefing, adding that the orbital outing is designed to inspire people.


SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk has said that while early space tourism flights may be out of reach for all but very wealthy people, these pioneering missions will lay the groundwork for more regular and more affordable trips to space in the future.

If successful, the Inspiration4 expedition will represent a major leap for space tourism. It will also be a boon for SpaceX, which has dominated the private spaceflight industry, including over rivals such as Bezos and his aerospace company Blue Origin.

Joining Isaacman on the journey will be 29-year-old Hayley Arceneaux, a bone cancer survivor who now works as a physician assistant at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Arceneaux, who will act as the crew's chief medical officer, will become the youngest American to fly in space.

Chris Sembroski, a 42-year-old U.S. Air Force veteran and aerospace data engineer, and 51-year-old Sian Proctor, a geoscientist and licensed pilot, will round out the crew.

The expedition is part of a charity initiative to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. In addition to giving $100 million to St. Jude, Isaacman donated the three other seats on the Inspiration4 flight to his crew members.

Procter, a former NASA astronaut candidate, won her ticket to space through an online contest conducted by Shift4 Payments. Sembroski won his seat in a charity drive to raise money for St. Jude.

The Inspiration4 mission will resemble SpaceX's routine flights to the International Space Station, except this time, the capsule will not dock at the orbiting lab. Instead, the spacecraft will circle the planet 15 times each day from an altitude of nearly 360 miles, higher than the current orbits of the space station and the Hubble Space Telescope, according to SpaceX.

Though the flight is an important milestone for the space tourism industry, the Inspiration4 crew members will not just be along for the ride. During their three-day expedition, Isaacman, Proctor, Sembroski and Arceneaux will perform a series of medical experiments that could inform future spaceflights and have applications for human health closer to home.

The crew members have been undergoing intense spaceflight training since March, including in simulators and on zero-G flights that offer short periods of microgravity.

In a preflight briefing, Proctor spoke about her excitement and anticipation ahead of the launch.

"Since the announcement when we were here last, every day has been the best day of my life," Proctor said, speaking from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. "Every day, it just gets better and better."

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#732 Post by PHXPhlyer » Thu Sep 16, 2021 12:18 am

4 more "Real" Astronauts minted. ^:)^ :YMAPPLAUSE: :-bd
Stuck the first stage landing, too. :YMAPPLAUSE: :YMPARTY:

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#733 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Thu Sep 16, 2021 10:25 am

In praise of the Elongated Tusk!
It has not always been easy to get behind the billionaires’ space race. Let them have their midlife crisis. Some of us have taxes to pay. If Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Richard Branson want to get as far away from our planet as possible, at the greatest expense imaginable, well, good luck – and good riddance. You go on ahead, lads, we’ll be right behind you. It’s all just so embarrassing.

But then SpaceX, Musk’s space company, goes and does something really quite remarkable and you have to stand back and applaud, while picking crumbs of humble pie off your jersey. It sucks.

At 8pm last night in Florida (1am BST, Thursday), SpaceX successfully launched the first all-civilian crew into orbit. The four-person team will spend three days orbiting Earth at an altitude of 575km, which I’m told is 150km higher than the International Space Station and the highest any human has flown since the Space Shuttle missions to the moon. Not only that, but the crew will conduct health research during the trip to try and better understand how humans can survive in space.

The Inspiration4 mission is not, then, a pointless bit of willy waving. It could be a genuinely ground-breaking moment in human history. Why? Because the crew is not made up of professional astronauts. Two members of the team – Chris Sembroski, 42, a data engineer and Sian Proctor, 51, a community college educator – secured their spots via a sweepstake. Beats a dusty bottle of Babycham. Space travel suddenly seems a whole lot more accessible. Inspiration4 feels inclusive, as if we are all invested in its success.

As my colleagues Anthony Cuthbertson and Vishwam Sankaran explained: “If the mission is a success, it will mark a major step forward for space tourism, and for Elon Musk and SpaceX’s plans to make it accessible to anyone with the money to fund a rocket and spacecraft to carry them to orbit.”

Okay, so you could argue that the key phrase there is “anyone with the money” but today is not the day for cynicism. This mission very much feels like progress in the democratisation of space travel. And Nasa astronaut Shane Kimbrough agrees. “To me, the more people involved in it, whether private or government, the better,” he said from the International Space Station.

Space travel and tourism cannot become yet another thing from which the vast majority of us are excluded. Of course we aren’t all going to head off into orbit, but we need to feel that these missions are for the benefit of mankind. That they are research-led, not a game for the rich kids. Which is why we need less of Bezos and Branson in their shiny space suits and more missions like Inspiration4, which has helped to normalise the idea of space travel for all and should throw up a whole heap of interesting scientific analysis.

Elon Musk, man of the people. Never thought I’d write that. Funny old world.
https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/el ... 21187.html
Depressed, feeling a slump, then remember Lift = Coefficient of Lift x 1/2 x ρ x V-squared X S!

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#734 Post by Boac » Thu Sep 16, 2021 12:13 pm

It should not be forgotten either that the level of 'automation' in this mission is going to be of benefit to future space missions, not to mention the level of reliability.

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Re: SpaceX 1st Astronaut Launch

#735 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Thu Sep 16, 2021 5:00 pm

TheGreenGoblin wrote:
Thu Sep 16, 2021 10:25 am
In praise of the Elongated Tusk!
It has not always been easy to get behind the billionaires’ space race. Let them have their midlife crisis. Some of us have taxes to pay. If Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and Richard Branson want to get as far away from our planet as possible, at the greatest expense imaginable, well, good luck – and good riddance. You go on ahead, lads, we’ll be right behind you. It’s all just so embarrassing.

But then SpaceX, Musk’s space company, goes and does something really quite remarkable and you have to stand back and applaud, while picking crumbs of humble pie off your jersey. It sucks.

At 8pm last night in Florida (1am BST, Thursday), SpaceX successfully launched the first all-civilian crew into orbit. The four-person team will spend three days orbiting Earth at an altitude of 575km, which I’m told is 150km higher than the International Space Station and the highest any human has flown since the Space Shuttle missions to the moon. Not only that, but the crew will conduct health research during the trip to try and better understand how humans can survive in space.

The Inspiration4 mission is not, then, a pointless bit of willy waving. It could be a genuinely ground-breaking moment in human history. Why? Because the crew is not made up of professional astronauts. Two members of the team – Chris Sembroski, 42, a data engineer and Sian Proctor, 51, a community college educator – secured their spots via a sweepstake. Beats a dusty bottle of Babycham. Space travel suddenly seems a whole lot more accessible. Inspiration4 feels inclusive, as if we are all invested in its success.

As my colleagues Anthony Cuthbertson and Vishwam Sankaran explained: “If the mission is a success, it will mark a major step forward for space tourism, and for Elon Musk and SpaceX’s plans to make it accessible to anyone with the money to fund a rocket and spacecraft to carry them to orbit.”

Okay, so you could argue that the key phrase there is “anyone with the money” but today is not the day for cynicism. This mission very much feels like progress in the democratisation of space travel. And Nasa astronaut Shane Kimbrough agrees. “To me, the more people involved in it, whether private or government, the better,” he said from the International Space Station.

Space travel and tourism cannot become yet another thing from which the vast majority of us are excluded. Of course we aren’t all going to head off into orbit, but we need to feel that these missions are for the benefit of mankind. That they are research-led, not a game for the rich kids. Which is why we need less of Bezos and Branson in their shiny space suits and more missions like Inspiration4, which has helped to normalise the idea of space travel for all and should throw up a whole heap of interesting scientific analysis.

Elon Musk, man of the people. Never thought I’d write that. Funny old world.
https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/el ... 21187.html
FFS
Depressed, feeling a slump, then remember Lift = Coefficient of Lift x 1/2 x ρ x V-squared X S!

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