Departed during 2021

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TheGreenGoblin
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Re: Departed during 2021

#181 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Thu Jun 10, 2021 10:18 pm

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Re: Departed during 2021

#182 Post by PHXPhlyer » Mon Jun 14, 2021 2:36 am

Ned Beatty, indelible in 'Deliverance' and 'Network,' dies at 83

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/obituaries ... 3-n1270635
Ned Beatty, indelible in 'Deliverance' and 'Network,' dies at 83
The character actor also appeared in two “Superman” movies during a long, accomplished career that included theater and TV roles.

Ned Beatty, the indelible character actor whose first film role as a genial vacationer brutally raped by a backwoodsman in 1972′s “Deliverance” launched him on a long, prolific and accomplished career, has died. He was 83.

Beatty’s manager, Deborah Miller, said Beatty died Sunday of natural causes at his home in Los Angeles surrounded by friends and loved ones.

After years in regional theater, Beatty was cast in “Deliverance” as Bobby Trippe, the happy-go-lucky member of a male river-boating party terrorized by backwoods thugs. The scene in which Trippe is brutalized became the most memorable in the movie and established Beatty as an actor whose name moviegoers may not have known but whose face they always recognized.

“For people like me, there’s a lot of ‘I know you! I know you! What have I seen you in?’” Beatty remarked without rancor in 1992.

Beatty received only one Oscar nomination, as supporting actor for his role as corporate executive Arthur Jensen in 1976′s “Network,” but he contributed to some of the most popular movies of his time and worked constantly, his credits including more than 150 movies and TV shows.

He was equally memorable as Otis, the idiot henchman of villainous Lex Luther in the first two Christopher Reeve “Superman” movies and as the racist sheriff in “White Lightning.” Other films included “All The President’s Men,” “The Front Page,” “Nashville,” and “The Big Easy.” In a 1977 interview, he had explained why he preferred being a supporting actor.

“Stars never want to throw the audience a curveball, but my great joy is throwing curveballs,” he said. “Being a star cuts down on your effectiveness as an actor because you become an identifiable part of a product and somewhat predictable. You have to mind your P’s and Q’s and nurture your fans. But I like to surprise the audience, to do the unexpected.”

He landed a rare leading role in the Irish film “Hear My Song” in 1991. The true story of legendary Irish tenor Josef Locke, who disappeared at the height of a brilliant career, it was well reviewed but largely unseen in the United States. Between movies, Beatty worked often in TV and theater. He had recurring roles in “Roseanne” as John Goodman’s father and as a detective on “Homicide: Life on the Streets.”

On Broadway he won critical praise (and a Drama Desk Award) for his portrayal of Big Daddy in a revival of “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” a role he had first played as a 21-year-old in a stock company production. He created controversy, however, when he was quoted in The New York Times on the skills of his young co-stars, Ashley Judd and Jason Patric.

“Ashley is a sweetie,” he said, “and yet she doesn’t have a lot of tools.” Of Patric, he remarked: “He’s gotten better all the time, but his is a different journey.” His more recent movies included “Toy Story 3”in 2010 and two releases from 2013, “The Big Ask” and “Baggage Claim.” He retired soon after.

Ned Thomas Beatty was born in 1937 in Louisville, Ky., and raised in Lexington, where he joined the Protestant Disciples of Christ Christian Church. “It was the theater I attended as a kid,” he told The Associated Press in 1992. “It was where people got down to their truest emotions and talked about things they didn’t talk about in everyday life. ... The preaching was very often theatrical.” For a time he thought of becoming a priest, but changed his mind after he was cast in a high school production of “Harvey.”

He spent 10 summers at the Barter Theater in Abingdom, Virginia, and eight years at the Arena Stage Company in Washington, D.C. At the Arena Stage, he appeared in Chekhov’s “Uncle Vanya” and starred in Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman.” Then his life changed forever when he took a train to New York to audition for director John Boorman for the role of Bobby Trippe. Boorman told him the role was cast, but changed his mind after seeing Beatty audition. Beatty, who married Sandra Johnson in 1999, had eight children from three previous marriages.

Fun Fact
The river where much of the movie "Deliverance" was filmed was where I learned to canoe and kayak.
The guys who trained the actors and acted as stunt doubles in the movie started a river guiding company on that river.
I worked as a guide for them whenever they were shorthanded. They didn't pay very well, so I usually traded my services an kayak safety in return for lunch and a shuttle. :))

PP

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RIP - Scarface - "Rockstar of the Mara”.

#183 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Thu Jun 17, 2021 2:03 pm

It is seldom a death at 14 is celebrated with awe, but for conservationists, the passing of Scarface of natural causes marked a remarkable end for the most famous lion in the world.

“With its death, the Mara has lost yet another iconic lion,” said the Nation newspaper, with the Kenyan Wildlife Service reporting he “died in peace without any disturbance from vehicles or hyenas”.

Nicknamed because of the scar about his eye, he became sought after by tourists and conservationists, partly because of his gnarly face and exceptional mane but also because of his long reign at the top of many prides.

The Scottish wildlife photographer George Logan behind the Born Free Foundation book Pride Before the Fall, described him as the “rockstar of the Mara”.

“Lions are lucky to get to 15. For the previous week, we’d been receiving messages, photos and videos from Kenya, showing Scar obviously struggling and nearing the end.


“It’s quite rare for a wild lion to die peacefully and of natural causes, but thankfully and fittingly, this is what has happened for Scar. He lived wild and free right to the end, in the land of his birth,” he said.

Most male lions last two or three years as the king of the pride and are killed by rivals or become weak from their battle injuries and set upon by hyenas. But not Scarface.

“Even near the end, he defied logic by dragging himself 25km back in the direction of his original territory, near to where he was born. We feared the worst when we saw him in close proximity to the Salas males [lions], a trio of the most ferocious young males in the Mara, but they respectfully let him be, even when he defiantly snarled at them,” said Logan.

Scarface was the last surviving member of one of four male lions known as “the four musketeers coalition” because of their long domination over a variety of prides.

“He had this exceptionally big mane, which apparently makes lions more attractive to females. He was quite unique and stayed at the top so long with this crazy appearance and big personality. I would say he was the most famous lion in the world,” said Logan, who is part of a campaign to protect the remaining lion population which has gone from 100,000 in the 1960s to just 20,000.

He says the pandemic and disruption to tourism has devastated funding of conservation efforts with revenue that pays for rangers and anti-poaching patrols completely “eroded”.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/ ... vationists
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RIP John McAfee

#184 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Wed Jun 23, 2021 8:03 pm

Software developer, maverick, rogue and ultimately fugitive, he lived and died by his own rules and the world will be a more boring place for his passing.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/worl ... 71637.html

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_McAfee
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Re: Departed during 2021

#185 Post by FD2 » Wed Jun 30, 2021 10:06 pm

Donald Rumsfeld, former US defence secretary, dies aged 88

Architect of Afghanistan war died at his home in New Mexico surrounded by family
By Our Foreign Staff 30 June 2021 • 8:30pm

Former US defence secretary Donald Rumsfeld, who led the nation into war in Afghanistan and Iraq during the presidency of George W Bush, has died at the age of 88 in New Mexico, his family announced Wednesday.

"History may remember him for his extraordinary accomplishments over six decades of public service, but for those who knew him best... we will remember his unwavering love for his wife Joyce, his family and friends, and the integrity he brought to a life dedicated to the country," the family said in a statement.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/0 ... d-aged-88/

It's nice to hear that he loved his family so and brought integrity to his service of the country.

It stuck in my head when an interviewer asked him before the Iraq War what the plans were for reconstruction of the country when the war was over. He looked at the interviewer like he/she had sprouted a second head. There obviously were no plans apart from giving some ultra-rich investors the opportunity to become even richer by investing in companies supplying 'contractors'. That would be a 'known known' then Donald.
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Re: Departed during 2021

#186 Post by Undried Plum » Wed Jun 30, 2021 10:11 pm

Fukkim. Sorry, but fukkim.

He caused thousands of deaths on a pretence.

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Re: Departed during 2021

#187 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Thu Jul 01, 2021 11:24 am

If there is a hell, then there is a special place reserved for Donald Rumsfeld.
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Re: Departed during 2021

#188 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Thu Jul 01, 2021 3:43 pm

TheGreenGoblin wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 11:24 am
If there is a hell, then there is a special place reserved for Donald Rumsfeld.
Depressed, feeling a slump, then remember Lift = Coefficient of Lift x 1/2 x ρ x V-squared X S!

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Re: Departed during 2021

#189 Post by Undried Plum » Thu Jul 01, 2021 4:30 pm

I rarely say this about anyone: I'm glad that the bastard is dead.

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Re: Departed during 2021

#190 Post by prospector » Sat Jul 03, 2021 9:56 am

""I rarely say this about anyone: I'm glad that the bastard is dead.""

Doubt many would disagree with that sentiment, however if one has the time to listen to the comments of Ret.Lt Col Andrew Bacevitch in the interviews contained in the post by TGG/ 188, one can see there is enough blame to go round for many members of the American administration of that, and previous periods, especially the behaviour of the CIA in Iran that very likely started the ball rolling in the middle East. The fact that the War Powers Act. gives the president of the USA, virtually of his own volition, the power to decide who next to drop bombs on, without any consultation with congress is surely an abomination.

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Re: Departed during 2021

#191 Post by Undried Plum » Sat Jul 03, 2021 2:27 pm

Yes, Dubya was also largely to blame for the hundreds of thousands of deaths in Iraq. So was Tony B Liar. They were also to blame for the extensive use of torture. Although I wish neither of them any harm, I will not weep for them when their turn comes to die.

Dubya is/was a particularly sick bastard. He enjoyed watching videos of some of those torture sessions as a form of evening entertainment.

Kissinger is another one whose passing I will not mourn. I don't think many Vietnamese will either. During The American War two or three million Vietnamese people died and tens of millions more suffered terribly. He's a deeply evil bastard.

Madeleine Albright is yet another one who has a special reservation in Hell.


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Re: Departed during 2021

#192 Post by k3k3 » Sat Jul 03, 2021 2:36 pm

I had the misfortune to meet Rumsfeld twice, he oozed menace.

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Re: Departed during 2021

#193 Post by Undried Plum » Sat Jul 03, 2021 4:53 pm

prospector wrote:
Sat Jul 03, 2021 9:56 am
especially the behaviour of the CIA in Iran that very likely started the ball rolling in the middle East.
The overthrow of the democratically elected government of Iran was a 50:50 joint venture between the CIA and SIS at the behest of the big oil companies. The government had demanded that the people of Iran should have a share of the profits of the oil exports. BP refused and the Seven Sisters all joined in with a boycott of Iranian oil. In effect, the companies told the Iranians to choke on their oil.

The CIA/SIS coup imposed a ghastly dictatorship under their puppet Shah. The official report is mostly now declassified (other than the names of some of the guilty people).

The story of the torture and use of rape as a form of intimidation during the CIA's sojourn in Tehran is fully documented in a museum in the centre of that city. It's really quite shocking.

The Iranian people have never been forgiven by UKUSA for booting the Shah out of the country and reverting to democracy.

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Re: Departed during 2021

#194 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Mon Jul 05, 2021 2:51 pm

Donald Rumsfeld, secretary of defense under George W Bush, who died on 30 June at the age of 88, enjoyed one all-important attribute, which was to appear larger than he actually was. He enhanced his comparatively diminutive 5ft 8in stature with the aid of thickly padded shoes with built-up heels, which caused him to waddle when he walked. His staff called them the “duck shoes”. But he inflated his presence in other ways, too, promoting the image of a clear-thinking, decisive commander while determinedly deflecting responsibility when initiatives he had championed careened into disaster.

When American Airlines flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon on 9/11, he hurried out of his office and headed for the site of the impact, spending a minute or so helping to carry a stretcher bearing one of the casualties. Meanwhile, the country was under attack, but no one knew where the chief executive of the US armed forces was to be found. As a senior White House official later complained to me: “He abandoned his post.” The excursion elevated him to heroic status, as a decisive, take-charge leader, an image that persisted in part thanks to his heavily staffed publicity apparatus. It played no small part in distracting attention from his impatient neglect of warnings prior to 9/11 that a terrorist attack was likely.

Assuming office in 2001, he had loudly proclaimed his intention to “transform” the country’s baroque military apparatus from top to bottom, but left unmentioned for several months the fact that he was recusing himself from decisions on which weapons to buy because he hadn’t yet sold his stocks in defence corporations (which were climbing in value thanks to his promise of a budget boost). Questioned by investigators probing the scandal of a $26bn (£19bn) contract for air force refuelling tankers, which ultimately led to criminal prosecutions and the jailing of several of those involved, he claimed to be completely unaware of the events, asserting that he never met defence contractors unless he “ran into them at a party some place”.

Most famously, he vigorously promoted the 2003 invasion and occupation of Iraq, deploying a special unit in the Pentagon called the Office of Special Plans to generate intelligence asserting Saddam Hussein’s possession of weapons of mass destruction. When it became clear that Saddam had, in fact, no such weapons, he dodged responsibility for the fake intelligence. In the same vein, routine torture of prisoners by US troops came as news to him, while the thinly armoured vehicles in which troops were being killed by roadside bombs were somebody else’s responsibility. Whether the Iraq operation could have ended happily under any circumstances is open to doubt, but Rumsfeld’s micromanagement style – arrogant, bullying and ignorant – helped ensure disaster.

His capricious interference in, for instance, the professional military’s deployment planning before the invasion meant that units often arrived without vehicles, medics and other essential components. There was no plan for what to do once US troops entered Baghdad. He gave no thought to the likely consequences of disbanding the Iraqi army, or how to cope with the post-invasion arson and rioting that destroyed what was left of the Iraqi administration. He refused to accept that escalating attacks on US units represented anything other than a rearguard effort by remnants of the old regime. Thanks to lengthening casualty lists, the true state of affairs could not be indefinitely denied – though Rumsfeld attempted for a time to keep reality at bay by forbidding his staff from using the word “insurgent”, along with “quagmire” and “resistance”.

His earlier career should have given fair warning that there was less to the pugnacious little self-promoter than met the eye. His most signal contribution as defense secretary under President Ford was to energetically sponsor egregious inflation in estimates of the Soviet military threat, with the obvious corollary of a commensurate boost to US defence spending. The Pentagon budget had suffered an inevitable cut after the withdrawal from Vietnam, but under Rumsfeld’s auspices it began a steady upward climb that was only briefly interrupted by the disappearance of the Soviet enemy in 1991 – and has persisted to this day.

A field in which Rumsfeld did enjoy notable personal success in public life was one about which he could hardly boast: his efforts as an intriguer. Indeed, he earned praise from a master of the craft, Richard Nixon, who said of him, as recorded in the secret White House taping system, that “he’s a ruthless little bastard”. The same skills were evident in his business career. Leaving office when Jimmy Carter became president, he was hired by the Chicago Searle family to save GD Searle, their pharmaceutical corporation. The only product that could rescue the company was its newly discovered sweetener called aspartame. Unfortunately, there were tests indicating that it gave rats brain cancer, and the regulators were reasonably refusing to authorise its release. Rumsfeld made it his business to reverse the decision. It took him four years, but assiduous courting of the incoming Reagan administration elicited the required result.

A more remarkable aspect of his legacy is its endurance. Where once he cheer-led a spectral Soviet military threat and consequent fattening of defence complex profits, his successors deploy much the same rhetoric about (shrunken) Russian armed forces, while whipping up alarms about the allegedly burgeoning Chinese menace – as, all the while, the Pentagon budget climbs steadily higher. Sons and daughters of US soldiers and marines that he dispatched to the Middle East are still being deployed to the region, with no end in sight. Most grimly of all, Iraq itself is still in ruins. To paraphrase Christopher Wren’s memorial in St Paul’s cathedral: if you seek his legacy, look around you.
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Re: Departed during 2021

#195 Post by prospector » Tue Jul 06, 2021 3:28 am

An interesting theory?
https://www.rt.com/op-ed/528359-donald- ... raq-covid/

" Late US Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld made colossal errors of judgement during the Iraq War. But strange as it may seem, the thinking behind those terrible mistakes may prove invaluable in tackling the current global crisis.
On June 29, Donald Rumsfeld, the secretary of defense for Presidents Gerald Ford and George W. Bush, and one of the main architects of the US invasion of Iraq, died at the age of 88. He will be remembered mostly for the catastrophic consequences of that invasion."

"The goal of the American military intervention was not just to eliminate “the threat of the Iraqi weapons of mass destruction” – none of which were found after the occupation of Iraq – but to change Iraq into a modern secular state that would contain the influence of Iran. As a result, however, Iran only gained more influence in Iraq, Islamic fundamentalism saw a rise, many Christians left the country, women were pushed out of public life, and ISIS emerged out of the mess in Iraq."

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Re: Departed during 2021

#196 Post by FD2 » Thu Jul 15, 2021 11:02 pm

A Dedicated Engineer


Peter Brown, veteran RAF engineer who maintained the only remaining Flying Fortress in Britain – obituary

He developed a deep affection for the aircraft and for the American crews who had flown the bomber from airfields in his native East Anglia
By Telegraph Obituaries 15 July 2021 • 4:26pm

Peter Brown, veteran RAF engineer who maintained the only remaining Flying Fortress in Br[...].png
Brown with Sally B, the only airworthy B-17 Flying Fortress left in Europe, of which he was chief engineer

Peter Brown, who has died aged 88, spent some 70 years servicing aircraft in the RAF, independent airlines and in the classic and vintage aircraft arena.

In 1983, while still working for Heavy Lift Air Cargo Airline, an air freight company, Brown joined the team at Duxford airfield servicing Sally B, the only airworthy B-17 Flying Fortress left in Europe. He became the chief engineer, a position he held until shortly before his death.

He led the team of volunteers who serviced the aircraft and he flew in the vintage bomber whenever it made special flights or displayed at air shows. In 2005, to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, he took part in a memorable flight over Buckingham Palace with a BBC crew on board filming.

With the world watching, Brown was conscious that a technical defect would force the celebrated aircraft to leave the formation. But all went well: “When you fly up the Mall and over the Palace,” Brown said, “and see many thousands of people down there, it comes home to you what a great event you are involved in.”

Later that month, he was on the flight to commemorate the 60th anniversary of Operation Manna, the vital wartime operation to airdrop crucial food supplies to the starving Dutch population.

For the anniversary flight, Sally B was loaded with bags of bread rolls, red, white and blue flowers and packets of chocolate on small parachutes. Each Dutch town had paid for the bags to be dropped over their location; copies of the Flying Dutchman newspaper were also dropped (as done by the Allied air forces on May 10 1945).

In 2006 he was with Sally B when it flew to Poland to commemorate the 62nd anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising. Thousands of leaflets were dropped over the city every 15 seconds, watched by vast crowds.

Brown developed a deep affection for the aircraft and for the American crews who had flown the bomber from airfields in his native East Anglia. He flew on the annual flight over the American Cemetery at Madingley, near Cambridge, which he called the “most moving fly-past”.

In 1990 he was the aeronautical consultant during the making of the film Memphis Belle.

The Sally B preservation group commented: “Peter’s contribution to the aircraft and the Sally B organisation was second to none. His inspiration, engineering knowledge and tenacity have kept our B-17 flying for more than four decades. Our aircraft could not have had a better ambassador. He was a brilliant and warm person, engineer and team leader.”


Peter Brown, veteran RAF engineer who maintained the only remaining Flying Fortress in Br[...] b.png
Peter Brown

Peter Elliss Brown was born in Hopton, Suffolk, on November 9 1932, one of 10 children, and went to Market Weston School. In his early years he worked as a farm boy and shepherd before joining the RAF in 1949 to be an engine fitter.

During his RAF service he worked in the aircraft servicing flight at Upwood in Huntingdonshire, the home of four Lincoln bomber squadrons. He was attached to 214 Squadron and served with them on detachments to the Canal Zone and to Kenya during the operations against the Mau Mau.

After leaving the RAF in 1956 he worked for Freddie Laker’s Aviation Traders before moving in 1976 to Transmeridian Cargo, which operated the unique Canadair CL 44 “Guppy.” Brown remained with the company when it became Heavy Lift Cargo Airlines flying five ex-RAF Short Belfast strategic transport aircraft, Boeing 707s and a number of large Russian-built cargo carrying aircraft including the giant Antonov 124.

In addition to his role with Sally B, Brown serviced many other classic aircraft including the Catalina and Sunderland flying boats. His experience and knowledge was not restricted to large aircraft. He worked on Spitfire ML 407, owned and flown by the display pilot Caroline Grace, and light aircraft such as the Tiger Moth, Austers, and crop-spraying aircraft.

Brown’s unique contribution to the preservation of vintage and classic aircraft was recognised in 2016 when he was awarded the British Empire Medal.

He wrote of his experiences in From Plough to Plane, published in 2011 and later in The Flying Spanner.

Peter Brown married, in 1956, Vera Joyce Walker; she died in 2016 and he is survived by their two daughters.

Peter Brown, born November 9 1932, died June 10 2021
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Re: Departed during 2021

#197 Post by FD2 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 8:23 pm


Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, pilot with the Fleet Air Arm and ‘one of the most outstanding pilots’ in the wartime Navy – obituary


He destroyed seven locomotives during one bombing attack in 1945


By Telegraph Obituaries 22 July 2021 • 4:59pm
Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, pilot with the Fleet Air Arm and ‘one of the most outstandi[...].png
Johnny Myerscough serving aboard the escort carrier HMS Ameer with the British East Indies Fleet in 1945 Credit: Imperial War Museum; www.iwm.org.uk

Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, who has died aged 100, barely left Lancashire except to fly for the Fleet Air Arm in the Second World War, when he won a DSC for gallantry, skill and inspired leadership.

In January 1945, Myerscough joined 803 Naval Air Squadron, and after a spell in the naval fighter pool at Puttalam, Ceylon, embarked in the escort carrier Empress for Operation Stacey, codename for a naval photographic reconnaissance of Penang, the Kra Isthmus and Northern Sumatra during February and March, for which he earned his DSC.

On June 20, while flying from the escort carrier Ameer, 804 NAS (in the same air wing) carried out 84 bombing and strafing attacks which were “most encouraging … both in execution and results”. Myerscough personally was credited with destroying seven locomotives.

At war’s end, his commanding officer described him as “one of the most outstanding pilots in the Navy, who has shown exceptional flying ability and great wisdom as a leader. He has been a great inspiration to 804 Squadron.”

John Myerscough was born on August 28 1920 at Cottam in Lancashire, leaving Preston Catholic College at 16 to become a junior clerk at Preston Savings Bank. He volunteered for the Fleet Air Arm in 1940; rejected because he did not have an engineering qualification, he studied in his own time before “blagged my way” through the recruitment process.

In June 1941 he was sent for flying training to Florida, where on January 27 1942 he was awarded his wings. He made his first deck landings in a Grumman Martlet fighter on the carrier Furious on October 1 of that year, and was rated “above average”.


b Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, pilot with the Fleet Air Arm and ‘one of the most outstandi[...].png
b Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, pilot with the Fleet Air Arm and ‘one of the most outstandi[...].png (941.33 KiB) Viewed 95 times
Myerscough with his medals

Later in the month 893 Squadron sailed in the carrier Formidable for service in the Mediterranean, where on November 17 Myerscough flew one of two Martlets which strafed the German U-331. It was then torpedoed by Albacore torpedo-bombers of 820 NAS; Myerscough was hit and forced to ditch, but was picked up by the destroyer Quentin.

On July 11 1943 he was second in a flight of four aircraft of 893 NAS which set a record by landing on Formidable in 1 min 13 sec. The feat elicited a signal from the watching admiral: “Pretty work by that section of aircraft.” (The previous record had been held by 5 aircraft of 803 NAS 5 five aircraft at 29 second intervals.) Subsequently Myerscough flew throughout the Allied landings in North Africa, Sicily and at Salerno, and was briefly based in Gibraltar.

The squadron also escorted an Arctic convoy to Russia in late 1943, and in August 1944 Myerscough joined 845 Naval Air Squadron in the Indian Ocean, flying the Grumman Hellcat fighter on regular low-level bombing and reconnaissance sorties.


c Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, pilot with the Fleet Air Arm and ‘one of the most outstandi[...].png
c Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, pilot with the Fleet Air Arm and ‘one of the most outstandi[...].png (632.01 KiB) Viewed 95 times
On July 11 1943 he was second in a flight of four aircraft of 893 NAS which set a record by landing on Formidable in 1 min 13 sec. ‘Pretty work by that section of aircraft,’ said the watching admiral

Between 1941 and 1945 Myerscough flew 905 hours in 22 types of aircraft and made more than 200 deck landings, but after this wartime excitement he returned to his civilian career, and for 45 years was manager of what eventually became the TSB in Preston.

The Russian government awarded Myerscough a campaign medal, and reportedly when President Putin discovered that the medal was not of sufficient quality, a replacement was brought to Myerscough’s home in 2016 by an official of the Russian embassy in London.


d Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, pilot with the Fleet Air Arm and ‘one of the most outstandi[...].png
d Lieutenant Johnny Myerscough, pilot with the Fleet Air Arm and ‘one of the most outstandi[...].png (808.52 KiB) Viewed 95 times
Celebrating his 100th birthday during the coronavirus lockdown

Johnny Myerscough was a gentleman: industrious, brave, disciplined, polite, honest, reliable, meticulous, loyal, artistic, but often able to demonstrate a wicked sense of humour; he also enjoyed playing golf and watching football. He married Doreen Knowles in 1948, and latterly nursed her for 20 years until she predeceased him in 2008. He is survived by his two daughters.

He celebrated his centenary during lockdown, the residents and staff of his care home in Lytham St Annes becoming his family for the day.

John Myerscough, born August 28 1920, died March 30 2021
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EA01
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Re: Departed during 2021

#198 Post by EA01 » Fri Jul 23, 2021 7:11 am

John Cornell....AKA, 'Strop' ....23/07/2021


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TheGreenGoblin
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Re: Departed during 2021

#199 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Mon Jul 26, 2021 8:40 pm

EA01 wrote:
Fri Jul 23, 2021 7:11 am
John Cornell....AKA, 'Strop' ....23/07/2021

Another surf life saver's cap in heaven. Vale Strop!

Clever talented business man.
Depressed, feeling a slump, then remember Lift = Coefficient of Lift x 1/2 x ρ x V-squared X S!

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Woody
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Re: Departed during 2021

#200 Post by Woody » Tue Jul 27, 2021 2:16 pm

Often used to watch him during my school holidays, when I was learning to love Test Match Cricket :(

https://www.skysports.com/cricket/news/ ... -age-of-72
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