Departed During 2024

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CharlieOneSix
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Re: Departed During 2024

#81 Post by CharlieOneSix » Wed Jun 12, 2024 8:44 am

Comment te dire adieu :( . Very sad to hear of her passing, she was an icon from my youth and in particular this song brings back many happy memories of courting my late first wife. I shall dig out my LP with this cover and play it today. Oh oh chéri.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#82 Post by PHXPhlyer » Sat Jun 15, 2024 8:51 pm

PHXPhlyer wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2024 2:19 am
William Anders, Apollo 8 astronaut, killed in San Juan Islands plane crash
Plane was a t-34 Mentor

https://www.fox13seattle.com/news/willi ... lane-crash

SAN JUAN COUNTY, Wash. - Retired American astronaut William Anders, who was a member of the Apollo 8 crew, was killed in a plane crash just off the San Juan Islands on Friday afternoon.

Anders' son, retired Air Force Lt. Col. Greg Anders, confirmed the death to The Associated Press.

The plane that crashed was a vintage Air Force T-34 Mentor, which is owned by Anders, who is also a San Juan County resident.

Anders was reportedly piloting the plane when it crashed. "The family is devastated," Greg Anders said. "He was a great pilot and we will miss him terribly."

Video shows fiery small plane crash into WA waters near Orcas Island

https://www.fox13seattle.com/news/willi ... lane-crash

Crews responded to a plane crash in the San Juan Islands on Friday afternoon. Officials with the United States Coast Guard Pacific Northwest said the crash happened near Orcas Island before 11:45 a.m.

Early life of William Anders
William Anders was born on Oct. 17, 1933, in Hong Kong, but he grew up in San Diego. In 1955, Anders graduated from the United States Naval Academy with a bachelor of science degree, and received his master of science degree in nuclear engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1962. He completed the Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program in 1979.

Recruited by NASA
In 1964, Anders was selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to be an astronaut with responsibilities for dosimetry, radiation effects and environmental control.

He was a backup pilot for the Gemini XI, Apollo 11 flights, and was lunar module pilot for Apollo 8.

Apollo 8 mission
In 1968, Anders operated the Apollo 8 mission alongside Air Force veteran Frank F. Borman II and Navy veteran James A. Lovell, Jr. In total, he logged more than 6,000 hours of flying time.

During this mission, their command module floated above the lunar surface, and the astronauts beamed back images of the moon and Earth and took turns reading from the Book of Genesis, closing with a wish for everyone "on the good Earth."


According to NASA, the mission was also famous for the iconic "Earthrise" image, snapped by Anders, which would give humankind a new perspective on their home planet. Anders has said that despite all the training and preparation for an exploration of the moon, the astronauts ended up discovering Earth.

William Anders' retirement
In 1988, Anders retired from the Air Force Reserves and became the chairman and CEO of General Dynamics Corporation in 1991. After two years, he retired from General Dynamics and stayed as chairman until 1994.

Anders and his wife Valerie moved to Orcas Island in 1993. They have six children and 13 grandchildren.

Shortly after retiring, the couple established the Anders Foundation supporting educational and environmental concerns as a vehicle for supporting several of their interests, including Yosemite National Institute and the Olympic Park Institute.

In 1996, the couple started the Heritage Flight Museum around the P-51 Val-Halla. It has steadily grown ever since and currently resides at Skagit Regional Airport in Burlington. As the museum grew, their two sons found a passion for aviation and joined them in the Puget Sound area to help run the museum.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#83 Post by PHXPhlyer » Wed Jun 19, 2024 1:23 am

Willie Mays, supreme baseball talent considered best to ever play, dies at 93
The San Francisco Giants said the Hall of Famer died peacefully Tuesday afternoon.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/sports/wil ... -rcna42452

Willie Mays, whose prodigious power, blinding speed and eye-popping defense thrilled baseball fans coast to coast during the game’s golden era, died Tuesday, the San Francisco Giants announced. He was 93.

"It is with great sadness that we announce that San Francisco Giants Legend and Hall of Famer Willie Mays passed away peacefully this afternoon at the age of 93," the Giants said in a statement.

Nicknamed the “Say Hey Kid” for his boundless enthusiasm and penchant for greeting everyone, “Say hey,” Mays played for 22 big-league seasons, breaking in with the New York Giants in 1951 and then becoming a fixture in San Francisco when the franchise moved west. He ended his career back in New York with the Mets in 1973.

Mays was the sport’s consummate “five-tool” talent — he could hit for a high batting average, blast home runs, gallop around the bases, catch the ball and throw it with authority.

He recorded a .301 career batting average, slugged 660 home runs, banged out 3,293 hits, amassed 1,909 runs batted in and scored 2,068 runs.

Willie Mays slides safely into the plate on Wes Westrum's base in the sixth inning of the game against the Philadelphia Phillies at the Polo Grounds, New York, on April 1, 1951. Bettmann Archive via Getty Images file
Mays’ prowess with the bat was only matched by his ability to catch any baseball hit in his zip code.

He recorded 7,112 putouts as an outfielder, topping other legends such as Tris Speaker (6,788) and Rickey Henderson (6,468). Mays also won 12 Gold Glove awards, tied for the most by an outfielder with Roberto Clemente of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Mays is credited with making the greatest defensive play in baseball history — an over-the-shoulder snag in Game 1 of the 1954 World Series, capturing a drive off the bat of Cleveland Indians slugger Vic Wertz.

Mays sprinted into deep center and had his back to home plate, 425 feet away, when he made “the catch” on Sept. 29, 1954, at the Polo Grounds in Upper Manhattan.

Hall of Fame sportscaster Jack Brickhouse called the play: “Willie Mays just brought this crowd to its feet with a catch which must have been an optical illusion to a lot of people.”

The MVP award for the best player of the World Series was named after Mays in 2017.

Mays played in the old Negro Leagues and was among the first generation of African American players in Major League Baseball, competing alongside and against future Hall of Fame greats like Monte Irvin (a teammate), Jackie Robinson and Ernie Banks.

Then-President Barack Obama praised Mays, a Korean War veteran, in 2015 when awarding him the nation’s highest civilian award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

“His quiet example while excelling on one of America’s biggest stages helped carry forward the banner of civil rights,” Obama, America’s first African American president, said. “It’s because of giants like Willie that someone like me could even think about running for president.”

Mays was called up to the big leagues in 1951 and made an immediate impact — winning the National League’s Rookie of the Year award for his pennant-winning Giants.

Mays had a front-row seat to perhaps the single most thrilling moment in baseball history, when teammate Bobby Thomson blasted the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World,” a decisive three-run homer against the Brooklyn Dodgers to win the National League pennant on Oct. 3, 1951.

Mays was in the on-deck circle when Thomson, nicknamed “The Flying Scot,” hit the homer that thrilled New York baseball fans and thousands of U.S. servicemen listening on Armed Forces Radio in Korea.

Mays said he was convinced the Dodgers would walk Thomson to face him, then a 20-year-old rookie. He was so focused on what he’d need to do at the plate that Mays said he didn’t even notice Thomson’s game-ending, pennant-winning hit.

“When Bobby hit the home run, I was the last guy to get to home plate” to celebrate, said Mays, believing the ball had been caught, “and I’m saying to myself, `You’re on deck, fool, get up to the plate right away.’ ”

Mays was center stage during New York’s golden era of baseball when the Giants, Dodgers and Yankees ruled America’s pastime.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#84 Post by PHXPhlyer » Wed Jun 19, 2024 1:27 am

Willie Mays
Part 2



From Robinson’s rookie year in 1947 to the Giants and Dodgers final season in New York in 1957, at least one of those three New York teams played in 10 of 11 World Series.

A New York City team won nine world titles in those years, and there were six all-Big Apple Fall Classics.

And all of those great New York City teams had Hall of Fame center fielders — Mays, Mickey Mantle of the Yankees and Duke Snider of the Dodgers — leading to a generation of school kids in the five boroughs arguing over who was the best.

A 1981 song and ode to America’s pastime by Terry Cashman was appropriately titled “Talkin’ Baseball: Willie, Mickey & The Duke.”

Willie Howard Mays was born on May 6, 1931, in Westfield, Alabama, the son of steelworker William Howard “Cat” Mays and Anna Mays, formerly Sattlewhite.

His father and grandfather played semi-pro baseball while his mom was a top basketball player and track athlete in high school.

By age 16, Mays was playing for the Birmingham Black Barons, the famed Negro League club. He excelled playing against grown men in their 20s and 30s.

Giants scout Eddie Montague spotted Mays and told his bosses in New York to sign him immediately.

“They got a kid playing center field practically barefooted that’s the best ballplayer I ever looked at,” Montague reported, according to a book by Mays’ future Giants manager Leo Durocher, “Nice Guys Finish Last.”

“You better send someone down there with a barrelful of money and grab this kid.”

The Giants signed Mays to a minor league deal in 1950, giving him $4,000 and the Black Barons $10,000, before he was shining under New York’s bright lights a year later.

After losing all of the 1953 campaign serving in the Korean War, Mays didn’t miss a beat in 1954.

He was that season’s National League Most Valuable Player and led the Giants to the title.

After the franchise moved to San Francisco for the 1958 season, Mays made the All-Star Game every year as a Giant and won the N.L. MVP again in 1965.

In many circles, Mays is considered the game’s greatest all-around talent despite collecting just two MVP awards. For example, Mays’ godson Barry Bonds won that honor seven times.

Although modern statistical metrics might place Mays as baseball’s third-greatest player — behind Babe Ruth and Bonds — no one could match the Say Hey Kid’s flair for the game.

“I can’t believe that Babe Ruth was a better player than Willie Mays,” all-time pitching great Sandy Koufax once said. “Ruth is to baseball what Arnold Palmer is to golf. He got the game moving. But I can’t believe he could run as well as Mays, and I can’t believe he was any better an outfielder.”

Mays ended his career back in New York, traded to the Mets in 1972.

There were occasional glimpses of past glory. His first hit for his new team was a game-winning homer at Shea Stadium on May 14 against his former Giants teammates.

However, Mays’ New York revival proved anything but a showstopper.

At age 42 in 1973, Mays couldn’t outrun Father Time and sadly became a symbol of athletes who stick around a little too long.

He was a bench player on the Mets’ improbable N.L.-winning “You Gotta Believe” team that fell to the Oakland A’s in seven games in the 1973 World Series. In Game 2, Mays chased a drive hit by Deron Johnson and fell flat on his face, a shocking sight to baseball fans who still remembered the famed 1954 Polo Ground snag off Wertz.

Later that same game, Mays lost a ball — hit by future Yankees legend Reggie Jackson — in the sun for a triple. He partly redeemed himself later in that day, hitting an RBI-single (Mays’ last career hit) in the 12th inning, as Mets went on to win Game 2 to even the series.

But Mets manager Yogi Berra had lost confidence in Mays, who got to the plate just one more time the rest of the series (he grounded out).

He was kept on the bench when the Mets went to other pinch hitters in a Game 7 loss at Oakland.

Mays dressed quickly and bitterly left the clubhouse, denied what he had hoped to be a Thomson-like moment he had witnessed 22 years earlier.

“Did Mays play too long? Of course. But so did … countless others who wanted to stretch their glory,” wrote James Hirsch in the biography “Willie Mays: The Life, The Legend.”

“But Mays is synonymous with this particular sin for one reason: He committed it in the World Series, on television. The very medium that was central to the legend, that broadcast his gifts to all corners of America.”

Even though Mays was bitter about how his playing career ended, in later years he spoke fondly of those final seasons in Flushing, Queens — with particular warmth for Mets owner Joan Payson, who engineered his New York return.

Before bringing the Mets into existence, Payson was a diehard New York Giants fan. She was on the team’s board of directors and voted against the move to San Francisco.

Mays said he wanted to hang it up before 1973, but Payson begged him to stay.

“I played the year out in ‘72 and I said, Maybe I should quit (in) ‘73 and Mrs. Payson wouldn’t let me quit,” Mays said in a 2010 interview with GQ magazine. “I enjoyed it because it was fun to see the guys winning.”

Generous to a fault and admittedly careless with money, Mays struggled in his post-playing years.

Without the structure of pro sports, Mays would be chronically late or all together miss appointments. But his name still had value and companies, such as Atlantic City hotels, coveted even the most tangential Mays connection to their properties.

Contemporary and younger fans, who pour millions of dollars into fantasy leagues and online gambling, might find it hard to believe that Mays and Mantle were both banned from MLB for several years in the 1980s for their loose Atlantic City connections.

Mays took a largely ceremonial job with Bally’s Park Place Casino Hotel in 1979 while Mantle did the same for the Claridge Casino Hotel.

MLB Commissioner Bowie Kuhn likened those jobs to gambling and banned them both from all big league activities.

Those revocations were overturned in 1985 when former Olympics chief Peter Ueberroth became MLB commissioner. Ueberroth recalled sitting on a Southern California beach, going over MLB files on Mays and Mantle’s banishments and failing to grasp why they were persona non grata.

“There was literally nothing there,” Ueberroth told The Los Angeles Times. “They (Mays and Mantle) had played golf at casino-sponsored outings as celebrities; they were on casino billboards, but promoting golf events, not gambling.”

He concluded: “It wasn’t even a close call. No umpire needed.”

Mays insisted his work in Atlantic City was completely blown out of proportion by Kuhn.

“I am very pleased to be back in baseball even though I didn’t do anything wrong to leave baseball,” Mays said at the 1985 news conference that heralded his return.

Throughout his career and for decades after, Mays’ name in pop culture was synonymous with greatness and the sport itself.

“Peanuts” animator Charles Schultz, a Northern California native and huge Giants fan, drew a 1966 cartoon of Charlie Brown losing a spelling bee when he was asked to spell the word maze, like the puzzle. Charlie Brown spelled it: “M-A-Y-S.”

John Fogerty’s 1985 hit “Centerfield” used Mays’ name as a metaphor for the boundless joy of baseball: “So say hey, Willie, tell Ty Cobb, and Joe DiMaggio. Don’t say ‘it ain’t so,’ you know the time is now.”

In the 1989 baseball comedy “Major League,” Wesley Snipes played fast-talking speedster Willie Mays Hayes, who introduced himself to teammates: “Say hey! Willie Mays Hays here: Play like Mays and I run like (Olympic gold medal sprinter Bob) Hayes. How ya doing?”

In a 1997 episode of “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” the son of Capt. Sisko searched the universe for a rookie Mays baseball card as a birthday gift for dad, showing that the Say Hey Kid was still baseball’s most famed name 3,000 years into the future.

Mays had numerous TV appearances, including on “Bewitched,” “The Donna Reed Show,” “My Two Dads” and “Mr. Belvedere.”

Despite a Hall of Fame career that played out mostly in San Francisco, Mays never forgot his New York roots.

Months after the Giants captured the 2010 World Series — the franchise’s first since leaving New York — Mays brought the Commissioner’s Trophy to P.S. 46 in Harlem, a home run’s distance away from where the Polo Grounds once stood.

“This is my neighborhood!” he told students that snowy morning on Jan. 21, 2011.

As a player for the New York Giants, Mays lived on St. Nicholas Place, blocks from work, and would play stickball with kids in the street in the mornings before and evenings after games at the Polo Grounds.

“I used to have maybe 10 kids come to my window. Every morning, they’d come at 9 o’clock,” Mays once said. “They’d knock on my window, to get me up. ... So I played with them for about maybe an hour.”

When San Francisco won it all again in 2014, Mays brought the trophy to New York for a meeting with old-time Giants fans at the New York Palace Hotel on Jan. 24, 2015.

When asked how it felt to be back in Manhattan, Mays said he’ll always have a special place in his heart for New York.

“I never left,” Mays, who maintained an apartment in the Riverdale neighborhood of the Bronx all these years, said, bringing a roar of laughter from the crowd.

He thanked New York baseball fans: “When they like you, they love you.”

Mays married Margherite Wendell Chapman in 1956. After they divorced, he married Mae Louise Allen in 1971; both predeceased him. He and Chapman adopted one son, Michael.

Mays, who wore uniform No. 24 throughout his career, is always honored in every letter mailed to the San Francisco Giants, headquartered at 24 Willie Mays Plaza, San Francisco, California, 94107.

PP

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Re: Departed During 2024

#85 Post by Woody » Thu Jun 20, 2024 6:05 pm

Actor Donald Sutherland, star of films including The Hunger Games and Don't Look Now, has died at 88 after a long illness.
His son, the actor Kiefer Sutherland, announced his father's death in a statement.
"With a heavy heart, I tell you that my father, Donald Sutherland, has passed away. I personally think one of the most important actors in the history of film," he said.
"Never daunted by a role, good, bad or ugly. He loved what he did and did what he loved, and one can never ask for more than that. A life well lived."
Sutherland starred in films including The Dirty Dozen, MASH and Klute.
One of the Canadian actor's breakout roles was as Hawkeye Pierce, a surgeon in the 1970 film version of MASH, a comedy about medics in the Korean War.
When all else fails, read the instructions.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#86 Post by Fox3WheresMyBanana » Thu Jun 20, 2024 6:47 pm

..and Kelly's Heroes.
Only he could have made this character work.
RIP


He would do things like this, too

Bush found out in which hotel Sutherland was staying from actress Julie Christie's hairdresser and went to his room to personally ask him to participate in the project.
Due to difficulties on obtaining a work visa for Sutherland at short notice, the actor offered to work on the video for free.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#87 Post by Karearea » Thu Jun 20, 2024 7:15 pm

I've only seen Donald Sutherland in Kelly's Heroes where he gave a wonderful performance!

However have also glimpsed him in a few brief moments of video from a story that appeared to involve a conspiracy and the President of the USA, does anyone know what that might have been from? The clip I watched had him sitting on a park bench, wearing a dark overcoat, talking urgently with another character. I thought I'd made a note of the title but...
"And to think that it's the same dear old Moon..."

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Re: Departed During 2024

#88 Post by Fox3WheresMyBanana » Thu Jun 20, 2024 7:27 pm

'Shadow Conspiracy' 1997?

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Re: Departed During 2024

#89 Post by Karearea » Thu Jun 20, 2024 8:11 pm

Fox3WheresMyBanana wrote:
Thu Jun 20, 2024 7:27 pm
'Shadow Conspiracy' 1997?
It seems it may be JFK, this image from the IMDB page for that film is very much what I recalled.

I'll check out Shadow Conspiracy anyhow - thank you, Fox3.

Great actor.
"And to think that it's the same dear old Moon..."

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Re: Departed During 2024

#90 Post by Karearea » Thu Jun 20, 2024 8:20 pm

This is the clip I remember:

Donald Sutherland Monologue from 'JFK' [4:06]

"And to think that it's the same dear old Moon..."

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Re: Departed During 2024

#91 Post by Fox3WheresMyBanana » Thu Jun 20, 2024 8:25 pm

You're welcome.
They've all been in several Washington conspiracy movies - Costner was also in No Way Out.
Hollywood seems to think Washington is full of duplicitous, immoral, power-crazed maniacs. Wonder where they got that idea? ;))

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Re: Departed During 2024

#92 Post by Hydromet » Fri Jun 21, 2024 6:33 am

Was just running through with Mrs Hydro, the movies we've seen (not on TV) that starred Donald Sutherland. Just off the tops of our heads: Klute, The Dirty Dozen, Mash, Kelly's Heroes, probably a few others.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#93 Post by Fox3WheresMyBanana » Sun Jun 23, 2024 11:35 pm

Ed Stone, Project Scientist for the Voyager probes, aged 88.
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/obituaries/ ... -obituary/
vPIA23645_PaleBlueDotRevisited_1600.jpg
The Pale Blue Dot. The last picture of Earth when it was down to 1 pixel size at 3.7 billion miles, about 1/4 of the current distance to Voyager 1

Voyager 1 is now over 15 billion miles from Earth, Voyager 2 over 12 billion. Both spacecraft are now in interstellar space, Voyager 1 for 12 years, Voyager 2 for 6.
Launched in 1977 with a design four year lifespan, 4 instruments on Voyager 1 and all 5 on Voyager 2 are still transmitting data 47 years later.
Thanks to built-in reprogramming capability, they may continue to operate for another 3 decades.
The data transmission is incredible - Voyager transmits with 22 Watts of power, and the original transmission rate of 21.6 kilobytes/sec is now down to under 150 bytes/sec in order for each bit to have enough energy to be detected.
It takes 45 hours to send a signal and get a reply.

With 1970s technology! They each carry an LP record in the hope that aliens exist and can read it, that being the height of recording technology at the time.


They should have put Ed in charge of World Peace.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#94 Post by PHXPhlyer » Sat Jun 29, 2024 12:59 am

Martin Mull, actor from 'Clue' and 'Arrested Development,' dies at 80
"I am heartbroken to share that my father passed away at home on June 27th, after a valiant fight against a long illness," Mull's daughter wrote on Instagram.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/obituaries ... rcna159376

Martin Mull, the comic musician and actor who started with 1970s TV series “Fernwood 2 Night” and went on to appear as Colonel Mustard in “Clue” and on “Arrested Development” and “Roseanne,” died Thursday. He was 80.

His daughter Maggie announced his death on Instagram, writing “I am heartbroken to share that my father passed away at home on June 27th, after a valiant fight against a long illness. He was known for excelling at every creative discipline imaginable and also for doing Red Roof Inn commercials. He would find that joke funny. He was never not funny. My dad will be deeply missed by his wife and daughter, by his friends and coworkers, by fellow artists and comedians and musicians, and—the sign of a truly exceptional person—by many, many dogs. I loved him tremendously.”

Mull was nominated for an Emmy in 2016 for his guest role as political aide Bob Bradley in “Veep.” Most recently he had made guest appearances on “The Afterparty,” “Not Dead Yet” and “Grace and Frankie.”

He guested in 2015 on NBC comedy “Community” as George Perry, the father of Gillian Jacobs’ Britta Perry, and on CBS’ comedy “Life in Pieces.”

Mull had a recurring role from 2008-2013 on “Two and a Half Men” as Russell, a pharmacist who uses and sells drugs illegally and attended Charlie’s funeral in the Season 9 premiere episode. The actor also recurred on “Arrested Development” as a rather incompetent private investigator named Gene Parmesan who has a habit of showing up in inane disguises.

Mull was a series regular on Seth MacFarlane’s single-season Fox comedy “Dads,” starring Seth Green and Giovanni Ribisi as the owners of a video-game company, in 2013-14, playing the father of Ribisi’s character.

In 2008 he guested on “Law & Order: SVU” as Dr. Gideon Hutton, whose denial of the existence of AIDS leads to his conviction for willful negligence in the deaths of several people.

Mull’s film and television career really all began with his stint as talk show host Barth Gimble on the wickedly satirical, Norman Lear-created TV series “Fernwood 2 Night,” which was later renamed “America Tonight,” in 1977 and 1978. The mock talk show also featured Fred Willard co-starring as Gimble’s dimwitted sidekick Jerry Hubbard. These shows were spin-offs from Lear’s seminal soap opera sendup “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman.”

Willard and Mull reteamed on the 1985 HBO mockumentary “The History of White People in America.” Mull played Roseanne’s gay boss Leon Carp on her same-titled ABC sitcom from 1991-97, and he was reunited with Willard for a 1995 episode of the show in which the two were featured in what was certainly one of television’s first gay weddings.

On the Ellen De Generes sitcom “The Ellen Show” (not to be confused with the earlier “Ellen”), which ran for 18 episodes on CBS in 2001-02, Mull was a series regular as Ed Munn. He recurred on “Sabrina, the Teenage Witch” as Principal Willard Kraft from 1997-2000.

From 1998-2004 Mull was a regular on game show “Hollywood Squares” in a run of 425 episodes, many of them as the center square.

Martin Eugene Mull was born in Chicago to a mother who was an actress and director and a father who was a carpenter. The family moved to North Ridgeville, Ohio, when he was 2; when he was 15, they moved to New Canaan, Connecticut. He studied painting and graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Master of Fine Arts in painting.

Mull first broke into show business not as an actor or comedian but as a songwriter, penning Jane Morgan’s 1970 country single “A Girl Named Johnny Cash,” which peaked at No. 61 on Billboard’s country charts. He began his own recording career shortly thereafter.

He composed the theme song for the 1970 series “The 51st State,” and he was the music producer on the 1971 film “Jump.”

Throughout the 1970s, and especially in the decade’s first half, Mull was best known as a musical comedian, performing satirical and humorous songs both live and in studio recordings. He opened for Randy Newman, Frank Zappa and Bruce Springsteen at various live gigs in the early ’70s.

His self-titled debut album, released in 1972, featured noteworthy musicians including Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Levon Helm from the Band, Keith Spring of NRBQ and Libby Titus. Other albums included 1974’s 1973’s “Martin Mull and His Fabulous Furniture in Your Living Room,” 1974’s “Normal,” “Days of Wine and Neuroses” (1975), “No Hits, Four Errors: The Best of Martin Mull” (1977), “Sex and Violins” (1978) and “I’m Everyone I’ve Ever Loved.” According to a profile on the A.V. Club website, Mull earned “a hit on the Billboard Hot 100 with the single ‘Dueling Tubas.’ ” His early albums were recorded for Georgia-based Capricorn Records which was closely associated with the Allman Brothers and other Southern rockers of the era.

In the A.V. Club interview, Mull was asked how a painter found his way into acting, to which he responded: “You know, every painter I know has a day job. They’re either teaching art at some college or driving a cab or whatever. And I just happened to luck into a day job that’s extraordinary and a lot of fun and buys a lot of paint.”

“As far as the acting thing goes, I had a musical career on the road for about 17 years or so, I had bands and so forth, and it boiled down to just my wife and I playing big rooms in Vegas, and you couldn’t ask for more than that. There were limousines and suites and the whole thing. But I got sick of it. So I thought I’d try my hand at writing for television. And I had an ‘in’ to have an interview with Norman Lear, and I was a huge fan of ‘Mary Hartman.’ I went in and talked to him for, oh, I would say a good hour. We had a great chat. And afterward he said, ‘We don’t need any writers. It’s been nice meeting you. I’ll see you.’ And then six months later I got a call to come in and read for a part.”

After the attention he received for playing Barth Gimble on the syndicated series “Fernwood 2 Night,” he played one of the few lead roles of his career in the 1980 feature comedy “Serial,” a satire of life in Marin County.

Also in 1980, Mull had a supporting role in Tony Bill’s “My Bodyguard” as the hotel-manager father of Chris Makepeace’s protagonist Clifford. In “Mr. Mom” (1983), Michael Keaton was the stay-at-home dad, Teri Garr was the working mother, and Martin Mull “is the snaky president of the advertising agency, with plans for promoting Garr into his own life,” in the words of Roger Ebert.

In 1984 Steve Martin and Martin Mull teamed to create the sitcom “Domestic Life,” in which Mull starred as a Seattle TV commentator whose teenage son operates very successful businesses from his room and makes loans to his parents, but the CBS series lasted only 10 episodes.

The actor was part of the ensemble in Robert Altman’s satirical, little-known take on the lives of high school boys, “O.C. and Stiggs” (1985). That year Mull also played Colonel Mustard in “Clue,” an adaptation of the board game, one of the movie roles for which he is best remembered.

He starred in and wrote the screenplay for another little known film, the Robert Downey Sr.-directed “Rented Lips” (1988).

Mull tried series-regular television again as the star opposite Stephanie Faracy of NBC’s “His & Hers,” which disappeared after 13 episodes in 1990, and on “The Jackie Thomas Show” (1992), starring Tom Arnold and gone from ABC after 18 episodes.

The actor began his voiceover sideline with 1993’s “Family Dog,” an early series from Brad Bird in which he provided the lead voice.

Mull guested as himself on two episodes of Garry Shandling’s HBO series “The Larry Sanders Show” in 1992-93. He also had a supporting role in Robin Williams’ 1993 hit “Mrs. Doubtfire.”

Trained as a painter, Mull had practiced his art since the 1970s, and his work appeared both in group and solo exhibits. One of his paintings, After Dinner Drinks (2008), which is owned by Steve Martin, was used for the cover of “Love Has Come for You,” an album by Martin and Edie Brickell.

He is survived by his wife, the former Wendy Haas, an actor and composer whom he married in 1982, and his daughter Maggie, a TV writer and producer.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#95 Post by PHXPhlyer » Mon Jul 08, 2024 5:00 pm

John Belushi's widow Judy Belushi-Pisano dead at 73

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... widow.html

Actress and producer Judy Belushi-Pisano's passing was announced on Facebook on Saturday.

The post did not specify a cause of death for the former SNL writer, or give any further details.

Belushi-Pisano was married to the legendary Blues Brother actor for six years, until his death in 1982.

'Today, our hearts are heavy as we say goodbye to our sweet Judy,' a post on her former husband's fan page states.


'Her unwavering dedication and creative genius alongside Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi gave birth to The Blues Brothers, a timeless testament to the power of music and laughter.

'In the years following John’s passing in 1982, Judy honored his life and championed his legacy and Blues Brothers brand.

'As we bid farewell, we pledge to continue her work, ensuring that John’s legacy, and the Blues Brothers will never fade.

'There was no one like her. Judy made everyone feel loved. She was nonjudgmental, light, funny and pure. You could be truly yourself around her, that alone was a gift.

'The Belushi and Pisano families will carry your love in their hearts forever.'

Belushi-Pisano was a producer best known for her work on The Blues Brothers and National Lampoon's Animal House.

Belushi-Pisano was married to the legendary Blues Brother actor for six years, until his death in 1982

The couple attended the same high school in Wheaton, Illinois together

: Actress Carrie Fisher (left), Penny Marshall (right) and Judy Belushi attend a showing of 'The Second City' to raise funds for the John Belushi Scholarship Fund, April 18, 1983

She was born in Wheaton, Illinois as the youngest of four children to parents Robert Leslie Jacklin and Jean Buchanan.

She met her husband while they were both attending the local high school.

The couple wed in 1976 and briefly teamed up while Belushi was an SNL regular after his wife was brought on as a writer in 1981.

They were together until Belushi's death from a lethal overdose of cocaine and heroin at the age of 33.

In 1990, Belushi-Pisano remarried producer Victor Pisano and the couple welcomed children and eventually grandchildren together.

Her latest project was as an executive producer on the Blues Brothers remake that is in the works.

In 1990, Belushi-Pisano remarried producer Victor Pisano and the couple welcomed children and eventually grandchildren together

Her most recent project was as executive producer overseeing the remake of The Blues Brothers


The original starred Belushi alongside Dan Aykroyd, who met each other when cast as original members of SNL.

Belushi-Pisano was in charge of overseeing the The Official Blues Brothers Revival alongside Aykroyd and Pisano.

She and her husband also own the Belushi Pisano Gallery in Martha's Vineyard.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#96 Post by PHXPhlyer » Thu Jul 11, 2024 4:48 pm

Shelley Duvall, 'The Shining' actor and Robert Altman muse, dies at 75
Duvall is best known for her roles in the 1980 horror movie classic “The Shining” with Jack Nicholson and the 1980 comedy “Popeye” with Robin Williams.

https://www.nbcnews.com/pop-culture/pop ... rcna161374

"The Shining" actor Shelley Duvall died Thursday at her home in Blanco, Texas, her partner Dan Gilroy said. She was 75.

Gilroy said Duvall had been in hospice and bedridden for the last few months due to complications from diabetes. She died in her sleep, he said in a phone call.

"She’s gone after much suffering," said Gilroy, her life partner since 1989. "I can’t tell you how much I miss her."

Duvall is best known for her roles in the 1980 horror movie classic "The Shining" with Jack Nicholson and the 1980 comedy "Popeye" with Robin Williams. Known for working with film director and screenwriter Robert Altman, her first screen role was in Altman's 1970 comedy "Brewster McCloud," Variety reported.

Other works included "McCabe & Mrs. Miller," "Thieves Like Us," "Nashville," "Buffalo Bill and the Indians" and "Annie Hall."

In 1977 she won the Cannes Film Festival Award for best actress for her role in "3 Women." According to Variety, her role in "3 Women" led to her being cast in "The Shining."

In a 1981 interview with People, Duvall noted that the horror movie based on Stephen King’s book catapulted her career but said filming it was challenging.

She told the magazine that director Stanley Kubrick had her "crying 12 hours a day for weeks on end."

"I will never give that much again. If you want to get into pain and call it art, go ahead, but not with me" she said.

Duvall started to step away from acting in the 1990s, The Associated Press reported. Her last role was "The Forest Hills" in 2023, more than two decades since she played Detective Dubrinski in "Manna from Heaven."

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Re: Departed During 2024

#97 Post by PHXPhlyer » Sat Jul 13, 2024 5:01 pm

Dr. Ruth Westheimer, celebrity therapist who revolutionized public discourse on sex, dead at 96
As a 50-something psychiatrist, she found sudden fame by talking honestly in public about intimate subjects that few others dared to utter even in private

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/dr ... rcna132883

Dr. Ruth Westheimer, the Holocaust orphan who rose to become one of the most famous sex therapists in America, a 4-foot-7 celebrity with a big smile and a penchant for tackling the most taboo of subjects with blunt honesty and matronly humor, died Friday at her New York City home, according to her publicist Pierre Lehu.

She died just over a month after her 96th birthday.

"The children of Dr. Ruth K. Westheimer are sad to announce the passing of their mother, the internationally-celebrated sex therapist, author, talk show host, professor, and orphan of the Holocaust," her family said in a statement Saturday.

The family will hold a private funeral, Lehu said.

As a 50-something psychiatrist, she found sudden fame on radio, television and in bookstores during the 1980s, fueled by a simple formula: Talking honestly in public about intimate subjects that few others dared to utter even in private.

“I knew that there is a lot of knowledge that is around but doesn’t get to young people,” Westheimer told NBC Nightly News in 2019. “There’s a myth (for example) that women don’t need sex. Nonsense. Of course, they need sex.”

Her cheerful public persona as a celebrity sex therapist belied a painful path to arrive at superstardom. Born Karola Ruth Siegel on June 4, 1928 in Frankfurt, Germany, Westheimer was an only child in a wealthy Orthodox Jewish family. Her father, Julius, was a successful businessman who married her mother, Irma, a helper in the household, after getting her pregnant. By Westheimer’s account, it was an idyllic and protected early childhood.

That would change abruptly with the rise of Hitler and his antisemitic pogroms.

On Nov. 9, 1938, the violence against Jews escalated with Kristallnacht, a rampage across the Jewish neighborhoods of Germany after the assassination of a German diplomat in Paris. The synagogue where the Siegels worshipped was among the temples burned to the ground. A week later, the danger hit even closer to home. Nazi soldiers came to take away Julius Siegel to a labor camp.

“They took my father downstairs and before he went into the truck he turned around and smiled and waved despite the fact that he must have been horrified,” she recalled in the documentary, “Ask Dr. Ruth.”

Worried about their only daughter, the Siegels managed to secure a coveted spot on a kindertransport, a program sending a select group of Jewish children to the safety of a children’s home and orphanage in the Swiss village of Heiden. The plan was to protect Karola until the whole family could emigrate to Palestine or the United States together. Instead, the 10-year-old’s farewell to her mother and paternal grandmother at the train station would mark the last time she would see her family alive.

“My parents actually gave me life twice, once when I was born and once when I was sent to Switzerland,” Westheimer later told NBC Nightly News.

Life at the orphanage was hard: Dr. Ruth wrote in her memoir that the German Jews were forced to do the household chores and take care of the Swiss children. It got even harder when letters from her family stopped arriving in September 1941, a few months after Westheimer’s 13th birthday. She would later discover that is when they were sent to Auschwitz, where they would be murdered.

Once she turned 18, she was no longer eligible to stay at the group home, so she emigrated to Palestine with several other peers from the orphanage, settling in a kibbutz. Warned that fellow Jews would mistrust someone from Germany, she ditched her first name, opting to use her middle one.

“Ruth” was conscripted to be a sniper for the Jewish underground when war broke out after Israel declared its independence in May 1948.

“I was fortunate. I never killed anybody, but I could have if I needed to,” Westheimer told NBC's "TODAY" show in 2015.

Someone else, however, almost killed her. Just weeks into the war, on her 20th birthday, Siegel was severely injured in a bomb blast that left her feet severely damaged and in danger of amputation. She defied the odds and made a full recovery.

In 1950, Siegel accepted a marriage proposal from an Israeli soldier, David Bar-Heim, and accompanied her new husband to France, where he was accepted into medical school. Taking advantage of the opportunity to study psychology at the Sorbonne school in Paris, Ruth gravitated toward the education that had long been denied to her. But Bar-Heim longed to return to Israel, so the couple divorced.

While in Paris, she started up a passionate relationship with a Frenchman named Dan Bommer, which resulted in a pregnancy. As was the norm at the time, the pair married for the benefit of their child. Receiving a restitution check from the West German government for education disrupted by the Holocaust, the couple used the 5,000 marks to emigrate to New York City.

Crossing the Atlantic didn’t save her second marriage, and another divorce left Ruth as a single mother after the birth of her daughter, Miriam. Working as a housemaid for $1 an hour and teaching herself English through romance novels, Westheimer continued her education at the New School and graduated with a master's in sociology.

During a ski trip with friends, she met Manfred Westheimer, a 6-foot-tall engineer who would become her next husband. The third time would prove a charm: The couple remained together for nearly 40 years, until Fred’s death from complications of a stroke in 1997. They had a son, Joel.

Working at Planned Parenthood of New York City in East Harlem in the late 60s, Westheimer trained paraprofessionals to be family planning counselors. In the process, she found an affinity for relationship counseling. Enrolling in the Teachers College at Columbia University, she was 42 when she graduated with her doctorate. Her thesis used data from her time at Planned Parenthood following the contraceptive and abortive history of 2,000 women in the days before Roe v. Wade made abortion legal.

Realizing there was a void in family and sex therapy, Westheimer managed to land a berth working with noted Cornell psychiatrist Helen Singer Kaplan, who established the first clinic to treat sexual function in the United States.

When WYNY-FM community manager Betty Elam came around to the Cornell Medical Center looking for a volunteer to help fill radio airtime, Westheimer had established herself as an expert in the field. The NBC-owned radio station needed to meet FCC community broadcast requirements, and Westheimer seemed knowledgeable enough to field questions from listeners for one of those shows. The result would be called “Sexually Speaking.”

“I thought she had the perfect voice to talk about these subjects because she sounded grandmotherly and had the perfect attitude,” Betty Elam Brauner recalled to NBC News 43 years later. “She could say things and people would be shocked, but they wouldn’t be offended by it.

Her station’s upper management was less sure than Elam, especially given the sexually explicit nature of the calls and the potential to run afoul of decency laws in the region. So, they scheduled the pre-taped show for Sunday night at midnight.

Westheimer was also skeptical — at least at first.

“I didn’t think I’d do radio, you can hear my accent,” Westheimer told "TODAY" in 2015. “I thought there should be a program because we have the knowledge and radio had the power of the airwaves.”

People did tune in and listen. Elam said she knew they had a hit on their hands by the volume of fan mail that poured into 30 Rockefeller Plaza, where the show was taped. “Sexually Speaking” quickly went from a 15-minute slot to a one-hour show.

“Her warm, frank, and often funny answers are delivered in an idiosyncratic accent that invites but defies mimicry,” is how The New York Times described the rising radio star at the time.

By 1983, it boasted 250,000 listeners, according to Biography.com; a year later, the show was syndicated nationally.

Westheimer used her platform to preach empathy and compassion toward the LGBT community during the early days of the AIDS crisis and is credited with changing mainstream perceptions of the disease and its victims.

“Dr. Ruth took the shame out of sex, by emphasizing love and pleasure in its place, and she had that great giggle,” said Anka Radakovich, who wrote a groundbreaking sex column in Details Magazine. “She influenced a whole new generation of women to pursue the field.”

Westheimer kept working long after her radio show ended in 1990. She authored more than 60 books, lectured across the world, and continued to appear on television in as varied programs as “Quantum Leap,” “Melrose Place” and “The Hollywood Squares.”

The year after she turned 90, Westheimer released a children’s picture book called “Crocodile, You’re Beautiful.” In November 2023, New York Gov. Kathy Hochul appointed Westheimer as the state’s first Ambassador to Loneliness to help address the rise in isolation stemming from the Covid pandemic. She continued to give lectures, and also never stopped delivering answers when fellow New Yorkers approached her on the street.

“Even if they ask me a question that I’ve answered 25,000 times, I took it very seriously,” Westheimer told NBC Nightly News in 2019.

Westheimer is survived by her children, Miriam and Joel, and four grandchildren.

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Re: Departed During 2024

#98 Post by PHXPhlyer » Sat Jul 13, 2024 9:38 pm

Richard Simmons, legendary fitness personality, dies at 76
Simmons was found unresponsive Saturday at his Hollywood Hills home, one day after his 76th birthday, two law enforcement sources said.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/obituaries ... rcna161728

Fitness guru Richard Simmons has died, two law enforcement sources confirmed to NBC News.

Simmons was found unresponsive Saturday at his Hollywood Hills home, one day after his 76th birthday, the law enforcement sources said. The exact cause of his death is pending.

On Friday, Simmons shared a message on social media thanking fans for the birthday wishes.

"Thank you…I never got so many messages about my birthday in my life!" Simmons wrote. "I am sitting here writing emails. Have a most beautiful rest of your Friday."

He signed the post "Love, Richard."

Simmons, the fitness coach known for his eccentric personality and "Sweatin’ to the Oldies" workout videos, rose to fame in the 1970s and 1980s after opening a number of gyms and releasing dozens of fitness videos.

His website describes him as "one of the world’s most revered and iconic fitness personalities" who has been an "instructor and motivator for over 40 years."

"By delivering a serious message with his trademark humor, he has helped millions of overweight men and women lose more than 3,000,000 pounds by adopting sensible, balanced eating programs and exercise regimes that are energetic, fun and motivating," a biography for Simmons on his website reads.

Simmons grew up in New Orleans and weighed 268 pounds when he graduated high school, according to his website, which added that he "took control of his weight" by changing his lifestyle to include moderate eating and exercise.

From there, he took his talents to the West coast, moving to Los Angeles in 1973, where he was unable to find a gym that "wasn’t for people who were already in shape," according to his website. So, Simmons took it upon himself to create one, and SLIMMONS in Beverly Hills was opened in 1974.

It was at SLIMMONS where he taught classes and hosted seminars until 2013, his website said. His success also led to his own nationally syndicated series, "The Richard Simmons Show," which ran for four years and earned multiple Emmy awards.

Simmons also released 65 fitness videos over the course of his life, which sold over 20 million copies, and authored nine books and three cookbooks, according to his website.

Simmons had been something of a recluse since 2014, and in January, he spoke out against an upcoming biopic being made about his life starring actor and comedian Pauly Shore, which Simmons said he never permitted.

“I have never given my permission for his movie. So don’t believe everything you read,” he wrote on Facebook at the time. “I no longer have a manager, and I no longer have a publicist. I just try to live a quiet life and be peaceful. Thank you for all your love and support.”

Since that post, Simmons has been active on social media, often writing motivational messages and sharing stories about moments and people in his life. The posts have ranged in topic from his childhood in New Orleans to racial segregation to fitness and his family.

His death comes just months after he posted a cryptic social media message, writing “I am ….dying,.” He later walked it back, but the next day, he shared that he had been diagnosed with skin cancer.

In the March 18 social media post, he wrote that he had “news” to share.

“Please don’t be sad. I am ….dying. Oh I can see your faces now. The truth is we all are dying. Every day we live we are getting closer to our death,” Simmons wrote.

“Why am I telling you this? Because I want you to enjoy your life to the fullest every single day,” he continued in the post. “Get up in the morning and look at the sky… count your blessings and enjoy.”

The rest of the post included suggestions on how to lead a healthy lifestyle and reminders to hug the ones you love.

Later that day, he posted another update clarifying he was not dying.

“Sorry many of you have gotten upset about my message today. Even the press has gotten in touch with me. I am not dying,” he wrote. “It was a message about saying how we should embrace every day that we have.”

The next day, he shared that he had been diagnosed with Basal Cell Carcinoma, a type of skin cancer.

The day after that, he shared in another social media post that the issue was resolved after three procedures with a “cancer doctor,” Dr. Ralph A. Massey.

It was not immediately clear if Simmons’ recent skin cancer diagnosis had anything to do with his death.

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