Forgotten pilots or flights...

Message
Author
TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

John Birch and Jimmy Doolittle (2)

#301 Post by TheGreenAnger » Sat Aug 06, 2022 8:52 am

I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

Boac
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 15656
Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2015 5:12 pm
Location: Here

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#302 Post by Boac » Sat Aug 06, 2022 9:09 am

I have only had time to watch (1), but what an amazing story. Well found, TGA.

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#303 Post by TheGreenAnger » Sat Aug 06, 2022 10:31 am

Boac wrote:
Sat Aug 06, 2022 9:09 am
I have only had time to watch (1), but what an amazing story. Well found, TGA.
I am glad it was of interest Boac. It is a very interesting story as you say.

For those with time to spare, that might want to watch the Doolittle video, it comprises of multiple episodes which can be digested in chunks at one's leisure. Well worth watching.
I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Don Blakeslee

#304 Post by TheGreenAnger » Wed Aug 10, 2022 3:00 am

Considered to be one of the USAAF’s greatest fighter leaders, Don Blakeslee began his military career flying Spitfires in the RCAF before transferring to one of the RAF’s ‘Eagle’ squadrons. He went on to command a USAAF Fighter Group in the Eighth Air Force. Blakeslee left his native Ohio to join the RCAF in October 1940. After completing his training, he arrived in England in May 1941 and joined No. 401 (RCAF) Squadron, flying Spitfires from Biggin Hill. Engaged on sweeps over northern France throughout 1941, he was credited with destroying a Messerschmitt Bf 109 and damaging several others. He later transferred to one of the three US-manned ‘Eagle’ squadrons of the RAF, No.133, and shot down a Dornier bomber during the Dieppe operation in August 1942.

DonBlakeslee.JPG

That September, the ‘Eagle’ squadrons and their Spitfires were transferred to the USAAF’s 4th Fighter Group and Blakeslee took command of the 335th Squadron. The unit was soon re-equipped with the P-47 Thunderbolt and, in April 1943, he achieved his first success when he shot down a Focke Wulf Fw 190, followed shortly by a second. As one of the most experienced American fighter pilots in Europe, he was tasked with leading the recently arrived 354th Fighter Group on its initial operations. This was the first unit to be equipped with the P-51 Mustang and he was able to claim another victory on the type. His experiences with the 354th convinced him that the Mustang was superior to his own unit’s P-47s.

On January 1, 1944, Blakeslee was appointed to command the 4th Fighter Group based at Debden in Essex. The role of the Group was to escort the 8th Air Force’s long-range bomber force deep into enemy territory. A forceful, no-nonsense man, he left his pilots in no doubt as to what he expected of them when he addressed them for the first time with the words: “We are here to fight. To those who don’t believe me, I would suggest transferring to another Group. I’m going to fly the arse off each one of you. Those who keep up with me, good; those who don’t, I don’t want them.” His Group was equipped with the P-47, a fighter he had little time for. Eventually, the Group re-equipped with the P-51 Mustang. In March 1944, Blakeslee led the first Mustangs over Berlin, escorting a massed daylight-bombing raid. In just four months, his aggressive leadership led to the Group achieving its 500th ‘kill’. On June 21, he led his fighters on the first ‘shuttle’ bombing mission to Russia by 8th Air Force Flying Fortresses, a flight of 1,470 miles. Blakeslee and his pilots landed in the Ukraine after being airborne for seven hours in their single-engined fighters.

He was credited with 15.5 victories, but when there was a multiple claim he always allowed the junior pilot to take the credit – many believe that he actually destroyed at least 30 aircraft. His greatest asset was his outstanding ability as a leader in the air. One of his pilots described him as “George Patton in a P-51 Mustang.”

Blakeslee’s physical stamina, courage, leadership and determination forged the 4th Fighter Group into one of the most formidable and successful USAAF combat units – many claim it to have been the best. By the end of the war, it had become the top-scoring USAAF Fighter Group. After the loss of several high scoring USAAF aces, and having flown over 400 operational sorties, more than any other fighter pilot, Blakeslee was finally grounded in September 1944 and returned to the US to command an airfield in Florida.

He remained with the USAAF and commanded a fighter wing. Among his later assignments were two tours in Germany and one in Korea at HQ Tactical Air Command. Blakeslee was revered amongst the American fighter pilot community, who recognised him as one of the two most outstanding pilots in the European theatre, the other being Colonel ‘Hub’ Zemke. He passed away in September 2008.

Don Blakeslee’s Service Dates: RCAF/RAF 1941-1942, USAAF/USAF 1942-1965 Highest rank: Colonel Awards: DSC (2), Silver Star, DFC, DFC (British), Croix de Guerre Combat record: 15.5 destroyed Further reading: Allied Fighter Aces by Mike Spic
From FlyPast September 2022 Issue


There is a very interesting 3 part interview with Don Blakeslee on YouTube, Sadly the audio is very poor. I post one link here for those who might want to know more.


I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Bruce Carr - "The overaggressive pilot"

#305 Post by TheGreenAnger » Wed Aug 31, 2022 5:55 pm

Bruce Carr

Bruce Carr1.JPG
Bruce Carr1.JPG (33.32 KiB) Viewed 398 times
It was on November 2, 1944 that Bruce Carr lost his favored P-51D. He was leading a strafing mission against a German airfield in Czechoslovakia at the time. Knowing he wouldn't be able to keep his aircraft in the air, he bailed out behind enemy lines.

Impressively, he managed to stay undetected for multiple days.

Although he'd avoided capture, Carr had no food or water and began to feel that surrendering was a better fate than continuing the way he was. Knowing there was an airfield nearby, he traveled there with the intent to surrender, but instead came across a crew preparing a German Focke-Wulf Fw 190 with fuel.

Abandoning his initial plan, Carr decided to wait until the crew left before sneaking onto the aircraft.

Carr did his best to figure out how the Fw 190 worked, despite the labels being written in German. He managed well enough and as soon as he was able to, took off without anyone making an effort to stop him or even appearing to notice.

Leaving German territory was the easy part, as his aircraft had German markings. It was returning to Allied airspace in France that proved to be difficult. Inevitably, he was shot at the moment he came back into his own airspace. In the hopes of making it back to base, Carr decided to fly as low as he could, as quickly as possible. This worked well enough, except by the time he arrived, he had no working radio.

Making a grand entrance, Carr landed on the field at the base, without lowering his landing gears, and slid to a stop. Some sources say he chose not to deploy them, while others claim he simply didn't know how to.
Bruce Carr2.JPG
It didn't take long for people to try dragging Carr, who was presumed to be a hostile German pilot, out of the cockpit. However, he was still strapped into his seat.

According to him, "I started throwing some good Anglo-Saxon swear words at them, and they let loose while I tried to get the seat belt undone. But my hands wouldn't work and I couldn't do it. Then they started pulling on me again because they still weren't convinced I was an American. I was yelling and hollering. Then, suddenly, they let go, and a face drops down into the cockpit in front of mine. It was my Group Commander: George R. Bickel."

Bickel had a simple question for his pilot, asking only, "Carr, where in the hell have you been, and what have you been doing now?" This daring escape didn't stop Carr from continuing to fly, and he served the rest of the war. By the end, he'd earned the distinction of triple ace and was given credit for 15 aerial victories over 172 combat missions.

Bruce Carr's service in Vietnam and Korea
After World War II came to an end, Bruce Carr remained with the US Army Air Forces as it became the US Air Force. Initially, he was assigned to fly the Lockheed F-80 Shooting Star as part of the Acrojets, America's first jet-powered aerobatic demonstration team. They were stationed out of Williams Air Force Base, Arizona.

During the Korean War, the now-Maj. Carr flew with the 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on an impressive 57 missions, before taking over as the commanding officer of the squadron between January 1955 and August 1956.

Promoted yet again, Col. Carr later served in the Vietnam War, where he flew with the 31st Tactical Fighter Wing out of the Tuy Hoa Air Base. He primarily flew on close air support missions in the North American F-100 Super Sabre, racking up a whopping 286 combat missions during his deployment.

After World War II came to an end, Bruce Carr remained with the US Army Air Forces as it became the US Air Force. Initially, he was assigned to fly the Lockheed F-80 Shooting Star as part of the Acrojets, America's first jet-powered aerobatic demonstration team. They were stationed out of Williams Air Force Base, Arizona.

During the Korean War, the now-Maj. Carr flew with the 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on an impressive 57 missions, before taking over as the commanding officer of the squadron between January 1955 and August 1956.

Promoted yet again, Col. Carr later served in the Vietnam War, where he flew with the 31st Tactical Fighter Wing out of the Tuy Hoa Air Base. He primarily flew on close air support missions in the North American F-100 Super Sabre, racking up a whopping 286 combat missions during his deployment.

In 1973, Carr retired from the Air Force. For his service in three wars, he was awarded an impressive number of medals, including the Distinguished Service Cross, the Legion of Merit, the Silver Star, 31 Air Medals and four Distinguished Flying Crosses. In 1998, he passed away from prostate cancer and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

South Africa’s one-legged fighter pilot

#306 Post by TheGreenAnger » Fri Sep 30, 2022 5:58 am

Did you know that during World War 2, South Africa had a one-legged fighter pilot? This is the extraordinary story of Capt Douglas Smith “Doug”/”Shorty” Rogan DSO, DFC.

Rogan.JPG
Rogan.JPG (30.99 KiB) Viewed 347 times
2 Squadron SAAF

Doug Rogan Joined the South African Air Force as a Permanent Force pilot and he served with SAAF 2 Squadron from September 1941 in the North African theatre of operations. 2 Squadron were known as the ‘flying cheetahs’.

He almost immediately started seeing some success when on the 12th October 1941, he damaged a German Bf-109 flying a SAAF Tomahawk Mk.IIb, however in the engagement he took some damage. He had another success later that month, when on the 22 October he logged his first confirmed kill of a German Bf-109F near Gasr el Arid, during the battle his SAAF Tomahawk Mk11b again took on some heavy damage, however he managed to get home and score his first combat victory.

By the next month on the 06 November he had further success in the Tomahawk and recorded his second confirmed kill, that of an Italian S.79 short down in the Matruh area. The S.79 had taken some punishment from other SAAF pilots, but Doug finished it off, so was accredited with the kill.

Luck ran out for Doug late in November 1941. By this time he logged 60 “operation” flying hours, however during a routine operation on the 24th November he was Wounded In Action (WIA) when his Tomahawk received anti-aircraft ground fire, a 20mm AA shell struck Doug in his right leg. Severely wounded and losing blood, Doug turned for home and against the odds managed get both himself and his stricken aircraft back to base. So severe was the wound to Doug’s leg that his leg had to be amputated

Recovering in South Africa, Doug took inspiration from Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader CBE, DSO (Bar), DFC (Bar). Douglas Bader was the famous Royal Air Force pilot who was a double leg amputee during the war, he was credited with 22 aerial victories. Bader had joined the RAF in 1928 and in 1931, while performing some aerobatics he crashed and lost both his legs. When war broke he insisted on flying, even as a double amputee. His determination saw him become a Battle of Britain icon using a “Big Wing” of fighters to attack enemy formations over England. He also became a Prisoner of War after he was shot down over France later in the war, and despite his disability he frustrated his German captors by embarking on a number of escape attempts.

With this proof positive account that pilots who had suffered leg amputations could still perform in combat, Doug focussed on getting back to flying, and back to combat flying. Col. Laurie Wilmot promised Capt. Doug Rogan that if he could be passed the “fit for flying” test with only one leg, he would see to it that Rogan got a posting “up North” again (i.e. back to the theatre of Operations in North Africa and Italy).

1 Squadron SAAF

Fitted with an artificial leg Doug resumed flying fighters with 6 Sqdn on home defence in the following year. After a check ride he passed his fit for flying test and was returned “up north” as promised. Back in combat flying he was posted to SAAF 1 Squadron in November 1942, known as the ‘Billy Boys’.

His return to operations was marred by a couple of errors up front, one occasion he took off with a mechanic still hanging on to his tailplane but managed to land without damage to either the mechanic or his Spitfire. Also, once landing in a dust storm his Spitfire hit that of another pilot’s already on the ground. He however began scoring again later that same month on 13th December 1942, he damaged a Bf-109G whilst flying a SAAF Spitfire Mk.V. By 1943 his victories started to stack up flying in the famous Spitfire Mk. V, 12th Jan he shot down a Bf-109G (probable), 21st Jan he shot down a MC.202 (probable) in the Castel Benito-Tarhuna area. By 27th March he attained a confirmed kill of a German Me 210 near Gabes. On the 08 May he is recorded as damaging an Italian Re.2001.

He was “Returned To Union” (RTU – meaning returned to the Union of South Africa) after his successful tour on Spitfires in August 1943, by this time he was with SAAF 1 Squadron in Sicily. In all is final score from the war: 3 Kills, 2 Probable, 3 Damaged.

On the 19th of March 1943, Doug was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) for his actions and bravery. In later life he became an air fighting instructor at 11 O.T.U. When he retired from the Air Force he took up residency in the beautiful little coastal town of Knysna.

Another unassuming South Africa hero not known to many now, a true role model and inspiration to any South African, those who have disabilities and even those who do not.
https://samilhistory.com/2017/10/05/sou ... ter-pilot/
I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Jack Malloch, Alan Brough etc.

#307 Post by TheGreenAnger » Fri Nov 04, 2022 4:29 am

CharlieOneSix wrote:
Sat Apr 03, 2021 8:04 am
I took this photo of Jack Malloch's Spitfire in February 1980 at the then Salisbury Airport on one of the early runs of its Griffon engine...great posts, TGG :-bd
As my photo shows the initial ground runs were done before the paint was applied - not afterwards according to the description in the excellent video.
I had reason to think of Jack Malloch's Spitfire today and reprised his colourful life in sending these ZA links to an ops-normaliser of my acquaintance and thought I'd share them here too.

mallochspit.JPG
mallochspit.JPG (50.9 KiB) Viewed 296 times
Please excuse the occasionally eccentric grammar and spelling, and the rather amusing confusion between intelligence and intelligent, as in intelligent services, as opposed to intelligence services (if only it was thus)! =))

The facts herein are pretty much accurate insofar as what is known of the man.

https://www.flightlineweekly.com/post/j ... nds-part-1

https://www.flightlineweekly.com/post/j ... nds-part-2

The Brough book is the place to go for the best Malloch biography.

I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Captain Valérie André

#308 Post by TheGreenAnger » Sun Nov 06, 2022 3:40 pm



Valérie André (French pronunciation: [valeʁi ɑ̃dʁe] (listen); born 21 April 1922) is a veteran of the French resistance, a neurosurgeon, an aviator and the first female member of the military to achieve the rank of General Officer, in 1976, as Physician General. In 1981, she was promoted to Inspector General of Medicine. A helicopter pilot, she is the first woman to have piloted a helicopter in a combat zone. She is also a founding member of the Académie de l'air et de l'espace.

As a member of the military, she is not addressed as "Madame la Générale" (a term reserved for spouses of generals) but as "General".

She started as a Medical Captain in Indochina in 1948, already a qualified parachutist and pilot, in addition to being an army surgeon. While in Indochina, she realized that the most difficult part of her duties was retrieving the wounded, who were often trapped in the jungle. She returned to France to learn how to pilot a helicopter, then flew one to Indochina. From 1952–1953, she piloted 129 helicopter missions into the jungle, rescuing 165 soldiers, and on two occasions completed parachute jumps to treat wounded soldiers who needed immediate surgery.

One typical mission occurred on 11 December 1951, when casualties were in urgent need of evacuation from Tu Vu on the Black River. The only available helicopter, stationed near Saigon, was dismantled, flown to Hanoi by a Bristol Freighter and reassembled. Captain André then flew into Tu Vu despite heavy mist and anti-aircraft fire. There, she triaged the casualties, operated on the most pressing cases and then flew the urgent wounded back to Hanoi, two at a time. Later, she was put in command of a casualty evacuation flight.

She continued in Algeria as a Medical Commander in 1960, where she completed 365 war missions. She rose to the rank of Medical Lieutenant Colonel in 1965 then to Medical Colonel in 1970. She had a total of 3200 flight hours, and received 7 citations of the Croix de Guerre.

She has written two collections of memoirs : Ici, Ventilateur! Extraits d'un carnet de vol. (Calmann-Lévy, 1954) and Madame le général (Perrin, 1988).

She is one of eight women to hold the Grand-croix (Great Cross) rank in the Legion of Honour, with Germaine Tillion, Geneviève de Gaulle-Anthonioz, Jacqueline de Romilly, Simone Rozès, Christiane Desroches Noblecourt, Yvette Farnoux et Gilberte Champion. She is the aunt of politician André Santini.

She turned 100 on 21 April 2022.

She was well trained by Alan Bristow who sold her the Hiller helicopter she flew.

ABVA.JPG
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Val%C3%A9rie_Andr%C3%A9
I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Albert Scott Crossfield

#309 Post by TheGreenAnger » Thu Nov 17, 2022 3:39 pm

Suggested by this thread.

Scott Crossfield.JPG
Scott Crossfield.JPG (33.55 KiB) Viewed 151 times

viewtopic.php?p=350938#p350938



I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#310 Post by TheGreenAnger » Thu Nov 17, 2022 5:12 pm

I recommend the first of those interviews with Scott Crossfield, not least to learn how ended up "patting Ester WIlliams on her "derrière" and because if you do, you will watch the second one too... she was probably in her 70's at the time mind you! Rubbish - She would have been 53-24 = 29 years old...

:))
Ester WIlliams Derriere.JPG
Ester WIlliams Derriere.JPG (34.09 KiB) Viewed 135 times
I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Forgotten pilots or flights - Terry Bulloch

#311 Post by TheGreenAnger » Sun Nov 27, 2022 12:46 pm

Known as ‘The Bull’, Terry Bulloch was a Coastal Command pilot credited with the greatest number of sightings and attacks against German U-boats during the Battle of the Atlantic. By the end of World War Two, he had been credited with sinking four, twice the number of any other pilot. Educated in Belfast before joining the RAF in 1936, Bulloch flew with Coastal Command and by early 1940 was operational with 206 Squadron, flying the Hudson on patrols over the French, Dutch and Belgian coastal areas. This included several hazardous trips during the evacuation of forces from Dunkirk. He also bombed the Channel ports being used in Hitler’s preparations to invade England in September 1940.

Terry Bulloch.JPG

With the arrival of the B-24 Liberator, some of which Bulloch had delivered while serving with Ferry Command, 120 Squadron was formed at Nutts Corner, Belfast and he joined them as a flight commander.

October 21, 1941, he spotted a periscope and made the squadron’s first attack against a U-boat. He dived to attack, dropping three depth charges, but the result was inconclusive, and he was credited with a ‘damaged’.

Over the next nine months, Bulloch made six more U-boat sightings. He damaged U-59 as it returned to France and, two days later, he seriously damaged U-653 forcing it to return to Brest in France.

In September 1942 he was in Iceland and on October 12 he achieved his, and the squadron’s, first confirmed ‘kill’ – his depth charges virtually blew U-597 out of the water and it was last seen sinking vertically. On November 5 he sighted another and attacked it from bow to stern; his aim was accurate and his depth charges destroyed U-132.

On December 8, he and his crew took off from Reykjavik to fly a patrol over a convoy that had left Halifax in Nova Scotia and was approaching an area where naval intelligence estimated that a U-boat ‘Wolf Pack’ of 14 submarines was lurking in wait. Bulloch met up with convoy HX 217 and took up a position astern to counter a known U-boat tactic of shadowing the vessels while others from the ‘Pack’ converged. The weather was poor, but Bulloch picked up the wake of a surfaced U-boat and he dived to attack. The submarine commenced a crash dive, but it was too late as Bulloch straddled it with six depth charges. There was a great upheaval of water and oil. Wreckage and bodies soon floated to the surface. A Norwegian Navy corvette escorting the convoy investigated and confirmed the sinking. He then attacked a second with his two remaining depth charges, forcing the submarine to dive.

This was Bulloch’s 22nd sighting of a U-boat (he had attacked 12), far more than most squadrons would achieve. Before it was time for him to depart, five more submarines were sighted. With no depth charges remaining, he attacked each with his four Hispano 20mm cannons. On each occasion he forced the submarines to dive and abandon their attacks. A second Liberator arrived to relieve Bulloch and continue the attacks, forcing five more U-boats to dive. The attackers had been thrown into disarray and their positions revealed to the escorting naval forces that engaged them. Just two of the 90 ships were lost from the convoy.

During a tour as an instructor, he was attached to 224 Squadron and, on July 8, 1943, was on patrol near Cape Finisterre when he spotted the conning tower of a submarine in the wake of a fishing boat. He attacked and fired his eight rockets in pairs from 50ft. He then pulled up and attacked with depth charges. U-514, outbound to South African waters, was destroyed with all hands lost. At the end of his tour, Balloch refused to be rested and he joined a long-range transport squadron flying converted Liberators across the Atlantic.

After the war he joined BOAC’s prestigious transatlantic service and was to spend almost all his long career with BOAC and British Airways flying over the ocean he knew so well. He retired in 1974 and died in November 2014.
- From FlyPast Magazine
I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

TheGreenAnger
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 2005
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2022 11:40 pm
Location: Unfashionable end of the Western Spiral

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights... Samuel "Kink" Kinkaid

#312 Post by TheGreenAnger » Sun Nov 27, 2022 2:41 pm

I am often accused of being a South African chauvinist, and I must accept that I am. Here is a Saffer who led quite an extraordinary life.
Samuel Marcus Kinkead DSO, DSC & Bar, DFC & Bar (25 February 1897 – 12 March 1928) was a South African fighter ace with 33 victories during the First World War. He went on to serve in southern Russia and the Middle East postwar.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Kinkead

Samuel Kinkaid

Sam Kink Kinead.JPG

I recommend this biography to the house.

Kink Kinkaid.JPG
I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people - Newton

Post Reply