TODAY IS THE LAST DAY FOR RECEIPT OF SUBS TO RETAIN MEMBERSHIP.

Forgotten pilots or flights...

Message
Author
User avatar
FD2
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 4884
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:11 pm
Location: New Zealand
Gender:
Age: 76

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#361 Post by FD2 » Sun Jul 30, 2023 4:16 am

Flying Officer Lloyd Trigg VC RNZAF

So brave the GERMANS said he should get a Victoria Cross: RAF pilot Lloyd Trigg's heroism as he died in a hail of anti-aircraft fire as his plane attacked a Nazi U-boat so impressed the Nazis they recommended he get the ultimate gallantry medal

By Lord Ashcroft

Published: 07:16 AEST, 30 July 2023 | Updated: 09:21 AEST, 30 July 2023
Trigg.png
Trigg.png (138.54 KiB) Viewed 578 times
The pilot and his crew had been patrolling the seas off West Africa for several hours before finally, in the distance, they spotted what they had been searching for: a surfaced German submarine.

For any Allied air crew during the Second World War, an enemy U-boat was a huge prize. So Flying Officer Lloyd Trigg wasted no time in preparing for a daring, but high-risk, attack before the submarine had time to dive and disappear.

What happened in the next few minutes resulted in Trigg being posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross (VC) – Britain and the Commonwealth's most prestigious gallantry award – and receiving it in what are believed to be unique circumstances.

Today, just days before the 80th anniversary of Trigg's remarkable act of courage, I, as the proud custodian of his medal group, want to tell the story of his life and untimely death.

Lloyd Allan Trigg was born in Houhora, North Island, New Zealand, on June 5, 1914. The son of a farmer, he was sporty and played in his school's rugby first XV, before completing his education at Auckland University College.
Flying Officer Lloyd Allan Trigg wasted no time in preparing for a daring, but high-risk, attack before a German submarine had time to dive and disappear

Flying Officer Lloyd Allan Trigg wasted no time in preparing for a daring, but high-risk, attack before a German submarine had time to dive and disappear

Trigg had wed Nola McGarvie, and during the early years of their marriage he worked as an agricultural machinery salesman. Prior to the start of the Second World War, he was a non-commissioned officer in the part-time North Auckland Rifles. But Trigg had long been interested in flying, and in June 1941 he joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force and obtained his pilot's 'wings' after completing his training in Canada. He was promoted to flying officer in October 1942 and embarked for the UK to join RAF Coastal Command.

The following month he was posted to West Africa, where he joined 200 Squadron, RAF, which was seeking out enemy submarines that were harassing Allied convoys in the Atlantic en route from the Indian Ocean and South Africa.

Initially the squadron flew the light Hudson bombers from Yundum airfield, close to the mouth of the Gambia River. By the next summer Trigg had taken part in at least 46 operational reconnaissance patrols, convoy escort flights and anti-submarine patrols.

On August 11, 1943, following intense conversion training, Trigg flew an American Liberator heavy bomber for the first time in an operational sortie.

The plane had taken off from Rufisque airfield, east of Dakar, Senegal, on an anti-submarine patrol. Trigg and his crew were patrolling 240 miles south of Dakar when they sighted the German submarine, U468.

Trigg immediately set a course to attack, but as the Liberator closed in it was crippled by the U-boat's anti-aircraft gunners.

Rather than pull out and attempt to ditch into the sea, well away from the U-boat, 29-year-old Trigg maintained his course and, at less than 50ft (15m), with his plane ablaze, dropped six depth charges on to the U-boat.

At that range the stricken aircraft presented an easy target for the submarine's gunners, who could see their shells blasting inside the open bomb doors of the Liberator.

Seconds later, as the depth charges exploded with devastating effect, the Liberator crashed into the sea, killing Trigg and his seven crew, five of whom were New Zealanders.

It was a heavy price to pay for taking out a submarine.

The U-boat sank within ten minutes, and most of its 46 crew were killed or injured, some of whom fell victim to sharks and barracuda.

However, its captain, Oberleutnant Klemens Schamong, and six of his men were spotted in a dinghy the next day by the navigator on an RAF Sunderland. The Germans were later picked up by a Royal Navy ship, HMS Clarkia.
Schamong.png
Schamong.png (124.79 KiB) Viewed 578 times
Under interrogation, the U-boat captain praised the gallantry of Trigg in the face of 'certain death' and said he deserved to be awarded the highest honour possible.

Indeed, it was this recommendation, and another by the U-boat's First Lieutenant, Alfons Heimansberg, that led to the award of Trigg's VC on November 2, 1943.

Its lengthy citation ended: 'The Battle of the Atlantic has yielded many fine stories of air attacks on underwater craft, but Flying Officer Trigg's exploit stands out as an epic of grim determination and high courage. His was the path of duty that leads to glory.'

Trigg's VC and Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) were presented to his widow, Nola, by Sir Cyril Newall, the Governor-General of New Zealand, in May 1944 on the farm of Trigg's brother near Auckland, so family and friends could join in the celebrations.

In 2007, a researcher from New Zealand, called Arthur 'Digger' Arculus, who was making inquiries into the VC action on behalf of Trigg's relatives, tracked down Klemens Schamong, by then aged 90, to his home near Kiel, by chance the port where his U-boat had been built. Despite the passing of time, the former submarine captain vividly remembered his encounter with the Liberator.

In a letter, he told Arculus: 'We opened fire from our deadly two 20mm cannons and the first salvo at a distance of 2,000m set the plane on fire. Despite this, Trigg continued his attack. He did not give up as we thought and hoped. His plane… flew deeper and deeper. We could see our deadly fire piercing through his hull. And when Trigg was nearly over us, we saw his ash cans [depth charges] coming down on us and they exploded and damaged the boat to death.'

Schamong also recounted how he had told his interrogators on that day in 1943 that 'such a gallant fighter as Trigg would have been decorated in Germany with the highest medal or order'.

Indeed, Arculus obtained a copy of a declassified Naval Intelligence Division report from October 1943 which disclosed what had been learned from the interrogation of Schamong and the other survivors after their arrival in Britain as PoWs.

It stated that the U-boat's anti-aircraft fire was so accurate that the Liberator was ablaze before it had properly lined up the submarine, adding: 'She nevertheless ran in to attack with great determination and without deviating to avoid the U-boat's sustained and heavy fire.'

The Liberator crossed the submarine behind its bridge at a height of just 50ft, before it hit the sea and blew up.

However, as it had roared over, the depth charges tumbled down, and two exploded with tremendous force within just 6ft (2m) of the submarine. 'The U-Boat was thrown violently upward and suffered catastrophic damage,' the report stated.

The massive blasts ruptured the hull, tore engines, motors and transformers from their mountings, blew the fuel tank down and shook equipment off bulkheads. Water poured into the battery compartment and the sub filled with clouds of deadly chlorine gas – submariners' worst nightmare.

The U-boat went down inside ten minutes.

Miraculously, a German rating found a rubber dinghy which had broken free from Trigg's aircraft, which he inflated and then climbed into with two other seamen. Eventually, Schamong, his first lieutenant and an engineer officer, supporting a wounded rating on his back, were hauled in – comprising the U-boat's only survivors.

According to the naval report, the two German officers 'were unreserved in their admiration of the courage and performance of the aircraft's crew'.

Matt Limb, a battlefield guide and military historian, explained why Lloyd Trigg's VC is unique. He said: 'A small number of posthumous VCs have been awarded partially on the evidence of the enemy, but this is believed to be the only one in the medal's long and rich history awarded solely on information provided by the enemy.'

The vast majority of gallantry medals – whether to living recipients or those awarded posthumously – are announced on the basis of supporting statements by comrades who witnessed the relevant act, or acts, of outstanding bravery.

Wing Commander W. H. Ingle, Trigg's commanding officer, wrote to Trigg's widow revealing the circumstances of his death. He ended his letter: 'I hope it will be some consolation to you to learn of the gallant manner in which your husband died, fighting for his country. I am very proud to have known him.'
Attachments
medals.png
medals.png (127.83 KiB) Viewed 578 times

OneHungLow
Capt
Capt
Posts: 1866
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2023 8:28 pm
Location: Johannesburg
Gender:

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#362 Post by OneHungLow » Mon Jul 31, 2023 12:49 am

FD2 wrote:
Sun Jul 30, 2023 4:16 am
Flying Officer Lloyd Trigg VC RNZAF

So brave the GERMANS said he should get a Victoria Cross: RAF pilot Lloyd Trigg's heroism as he died in a hail of anti-aircraft fire as his plane attacked a Nazi U-boat so impressed the Nazis they recommended he get the ultimate gallantry medal

By Lord Ashcroft

Published: 07:16 AEST, 30 July 2023 | Updated: 09:21 AEST, 30 July 2023
What a fascinating story of valour in extremis.

I was apt to wonder what happened to the U-boat commander.
U-boat captain who shot down NZ VC-winner found
By MAX LAMBERT - NZPA | Wednesday, 18 April 2007


The captain of the U-Boat whose anti-aircraft fire shot down New Zealand Victoria Cross winner Lloyd Trigg's Royal Air Force Liberator more than 60 years ago is still alive in Germany, an Auckland aviation researcher has discovered.

Arthur "Digger" Arculus has also unearthed fresh details about the fierce Atlantic action that cost the lives of Trigg, his seven crew and many of the submarine's complement.

Uniquely, it was the testimony of the enemy skipper, Klemens Schamong, and the other few survivors from U-468, destroyed by Trigg's exploding depth charges as his aircraft plunged into the sea, that led to the posthumous award of the Commonwealth's highest award for bravery.

Trigg and his men perished on August 11, 1943, 386km off Dakar, West Africa, as they attacked U-468 on the ocean surface. Shells from the German vessel's flak guns ripped into the Liberator but the sheets of flames that erupted did not deter Trigg.

The depth charges released moments before the aircraft crashed exploded alongside the submarine with devastating effect. Schamong told Arculus they "damaged the boat to death".

Now 90, the old seaman lives in a small town not far from Kiel where his U-Boat was built, and commissioned exactly a year before its sinking.

When Arculus began researching Trigg's story for young Australian Sam Biddle, an eight-year-old grandson of a Trigg cousin, who wanted to know more about his famous relation, he decided to try to find out what had happened to Schamong.

Arculus, 80, started his Schamong quest by e-mailing a German contact. The man's detective work eventually turned up a John Schamong, a Captain in the German Navy. More checks showed he was indeed the son of the old submariner and, yes, his father was still alive.

Schamong Senior responded to an Arculus letter with a short note about the sinking and several enclosures, among them an old letter from the Canadian navigator of the RAF Sunderland that found the U-Boat survivors.

Schamong remembered the Atlantic action vividly: "We opened deadly fire from our `two 20mm cannons' and the first salvo at a distance of 2000m set the plane on fire. Despite this, Trigg continued his attack. He did not give up as we thought and hoped. His plane. . . flew deeper and deeper. We could see our deadly fire piercing through his hull. And when Trigg was almost over us we saw his `ash cans' coming down on us and (they) exploded and damaged the boat to death."

It was not surprising Schamong expected Trigg to "give up" because on an earlier patrol the sub's flak frightened off a Grumman Avenger from a US carrier escorting an Atlantic convoy.

Schamong told Arculus that he informed interrogators after his rescue that "such a gallant fighter as Trigg would have been decorated in Germany with the highest medal or order".

The letter said little else so Arculus asked Horst Ahrens, a friend in Kiel, to put a handful of questions to Schamong. Unfortunately the ex-skipper did not wish to go further.

It might have ended there but Arculus has since received a copy of the now declassified October 1943 Naval Intelligence Division (NID) report disclosing what had been learned from the interrogation of Schamong and the other survivors after their arrival in Britain as POWs.

The report said the U-Boat's shooting was so accurate the Liberator was on fire before she had properly lined up the sub.

"She nevertheless ran in to attack with great determination and without deviating to avoid the U-Boat's sustained and heavy fire."

The aircraft crossed the submarine behind the bridge at a height of just 15m, hit the sea 300m away and blew up. But as she roared over the U-Boat the depth charges tumbled down, two exploding with tremendous force within 2m of the submarine.

"The whole U-Boat was thrown violently upward and suffered catastrophic damage."

The massive blasts ruptured the hull, tore engines, motors and transformers from their mountings, blew the fuel tank above the diesels down and shook equipment off bulkheads.

Water poured into the battery compartment and the sub filled with clouds of choking, killing chlorine gas, submariners' worst nightmare.

The U-Boat went down inside 10 minutes, leaving 20 swimming crew battling the horror of sharks and barracuda, attracted by blood leaking from wounds.

Then miraculously a rating found an RAF rubber dinghy floating in the aircraft's debris, inflated it and climbed in with two other seamen. Eventually, Schamong, his first lieutenant and an engineer officer supporting a wounded rating on his back were hauled in – seven survivors from a crew of 39.

A Sunderland, searching for the missing Liberator crew, spotted the dinghy the following day, its crew understandably jumping to the conclusion the waving men were their RAF mates.

Arculus' research trail led recently to Patrick Dempsey, 84, the Sunderland's Canadian navigator, now living in Florida.

Dempsey says he remembers watching sharks circling the dinghy and some swimming under it. "We could see them very plainly from the air."

He worked out the position of the dingy, radioed it to base "and then we prepared to drop two emergency supply packs which were about the size of a man each".

The Sunderland made two runs, the first so accurate the package almost hit the dinghy, scaring the Germans out of their wits. The second was much further away – too far away to recover because there were no paddles in the survivors' dinghy.

The patrolling aircraft dropped marker dye and headed home. HMS Clarkia arrived the next day and took the Germans aboard.

The NID report called Schamong "a civilised type with considerable poise and charm, in marked contrast to many U-Boat officers. He nevertheless had very firm ideas of the duties of a German officer in captivity, was constantly on his guard and divulged nothing concerning his boat except the story of the sinking".

Arculus was unable to discover anything about Schamong's postwar life until he got an unexpected e-mail recently from Wolfgang Schamong, a nephew, who unravelled this small mystery.

The younger man revealed his uncle became a lawyer after the war, eventually joined Germany's Defence Ministry and in the mid-1970s headed a liaison team in Paris working on German-French naval ships. He and his wife had son John and twin daughters.

Schamong also told Arculus an astonishing story about his uncle's mother, a devout Catholic.

"Now, the same day when the `Atlantic' fight took place she was at home in Cologne asleep and suddenly woke hearing the noise of water streaming into the room. She first thought of some damage to the water pipes but then said to her husband, `It's not here. I see Klemens' U-Boat sinking but he and some others are safe'."

A mother's intuition perhaps.

Oberleutnant zur See Klemens Schamong, who joined the German navy in 1938, was the only skipper of U-468 and it was his first and last command.

The U-Boat didn't have much luck as she hunted with submarine packs in the North Atlantic during her first two patrols, sinking only one Allied ship, a small empty west-bound tanker.

She left La Pallice, on France's Atlantic Coast, on her third patrol on July 7, 1943, and was sunk by Trigg barely a month later. Schamong's fuel-short boat was returning to base when Trigg found her, creeping along the West African coast.

Flying Officer Lloyd Allan Trigg, born at Houhora, Northland, in May 1914, was about four years older than Schamong. He farmed, then became a salesman before enlisting in June 1941.

Trigg trained in Canada and after reaching England was posted to 200 Squadron in West Africa flying Hudsons.

He did about 50 operations – shipping reconnaissance, convoy patrols, anti-submarine flights – on the twin-engined aircraft before flying to the US in May 1943 for a conversion course to fly Liberators, much bigger four-engined American bombers.

The New Zealander died not knowing he had already been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) for two determined attacks on U-Boats in March 1943. Notification had not reached his squadron before his death.

Four of the other seven airmen killed with him were New Zealanders – Ivan Marinovich (navigator), 26, from Auckland, Arthur Bennett (wireless operator), 29, Lower Hutt, Lawrence Frost (gunner), 22, Auckland, and Terry Soper (gunner), 21, Takaka.

Marinovich and Bennett were in Trigg's original Hudson crew and together the five hugely experienced New Zealanders collectively totalled more than 250 ops. Frost had done no fewer than 65. Two Britons and a Canadian made up the rest of the crew. All eight are commemorated on the Malta Memorial to the air war dead.

The final two sentences of Trigg's citation declare that the Liberator captain's exploit stood out in the Battle of the Atlantic as an "epic of grim determination and high courage. His was the path of duty that leads to glory".

The same could be said too of all his crew.
https://rnzaf.proboards.com/thread/1361 ... hot-winner
le parapluie de ma tante est cassé

User avatar
FD2
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 4884
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:11 pm
Location: New Zealand
Gender:
Age: 76

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#363 Post by FD2 » Mon Jul 31, 2023 2:52 am

Outstanding gallantry.

Sounds like they straddled the U-boat - very similar to what HMS Antrim Flight's Wessex did to the Argentinian boat Santa Fe off South Georgia - but they weren't in flames and crashing

User avatar
FD2
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 4884
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:11 pm
Location: New Zealand
Gender:
Age: 76

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#364 Post by FD2 » Thu Aug 17, 2023 10:56 am

Carl Haines

Carl Haines obituary
Quick-sighted naval aviator who flew 175 missions during the Korean War and took part in one of the most famous dogfights in history

Thursday August 17 2023, 12.01am BST, The Times
Armed Forces
Ellis, Carmichael, Davies and Haines.jpg
Ellis, Carmichael, Davies and Haines.jpg (59.8 KiB) Viewed 423 times

As the sun burnt off the morning mist on August 9, 1952 Carl Haines, a naval aviator, was the first to see the enemy fighter jets — eight Russian-made MiG-15s — at about 4,000ft southwest of Pyongyang in North Korea. He was known as “the sharpest eyes in the fleet”.

Haines, a boyish-looking sub-lieutenant aged just 21, was at the controls of a piston-engined Hawker Sea Fury, flying with three others from 802 Naval Air Squadron, looking for targets on the ground such as railway transport and bridges. They were outnumbered — and outclassed. The modern MiGs were 200mph faster.

Flying as wingman to the formation leader, Lieutenant Peter “Hoagy” Carmichael, a veteran of the Second World War, Haines had first caught sight of the enemy aircraft as they flew just above the moonlit horizon, and immediately called “MiGs four o’clock high”. The two other pilots in the formation were Lieutenant Peter Davis and his wingman, Sub-Lieutenant Brian “Smoo” Ellis.

The British airmen were part of a United Nations force opposing a Communist invasion of South Korea, then a fledgling democracy supported by the West.

The Sea Furies had taken off from the deck of the Colossus-class aircraft carrier HMS Ocean, which was sailing off the west coast of Korea, at 5.25am for a routine patrol between Chinnampo and Pyongyang. They were armed with 20mm cannon.

According to 802 Squadron’s diary: “The bogies were identified as MiGs — and they were closing. By this time, [the Furies] drop tanks were fluttering earthwards and the flight had assumed proper battle formation, and No 4 — Sub-Lieutenant Ellis — had noticed a shower of red tracer streaming past both sides of his fuselage. He cried ‘Break’ over the R/T and the flight commenced a ‘Scissors’.”

An essentially defensive manoeuvre used by fighter pilots, the scissors consists of a series of short turns towards the attacking aircraft, slowing with each turn, in the hope of forcing the attacker to overshoot. When it is performed effectively, the scissors can cause the attacking aircraft to move far enough in front to allow the defender to turn the tables and attack.

According to the 802 Squadron diary, it quickly became apparent that four MiGs were after each section of two Furies, but by continuing their break turns the British aircraft presented almost impossible targets.

“On one occasion,” the diary reads, “a MiG came head-on to Lieutenant Carmichael and Sub-Lieutenant Haines — they both fired — it broke away and proceeded to go head-on to Lieutenant Davies and Sub-Lieutenant Ellis. They both fired and registered hits.

“On another occasion, a MiG pulled up in front of Ellis with its air brakes out and he was amused to find the range closing. He gave a long burst and noticed hits on the enemy’s wings. The aircraft then proceeded northwards at a reduced speed with two other MiGs in company. Meanwhile, the flight, still in its battle formation, managed a dozen or so more firing passes at MiGs head-on.”

The dogfight lasted four-to-five minutes before the eight North Korean MiGs disappeared. One of them crashed into a hillside and blew up. Two or three others were damaged.

For the Royal Navy, it was the first occasion on which one of their fighters had shot down an enemy aircraft during the Korean War, which lasted from June 1950 to July 1953. More remarkably, it had been achieved, for the first time in Korea, by propeller-driven aircraft against jet fighters.

When they returned to HMS Ocean, the ship was humming with excitement and the pilots received an ecstatic welcome. The destruction of the MiG became a source of great pride to the Fleet Air Arm but also one of controversy.

Although all four pilots claimed a share of the “kill”, Carmichael, as flight leader, was given credit for destroying the MiG and awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. He was sent home early to be fêted in Britain.

Today, it is generally accepted — as it was among many naval aviators in 1952 — that the man responsible was Smoo Ellis, thanks to the sharp eyes of Haines, who flew a total of 175 missions in Korea with 804 Squadron in HMS Glory and 802 Squadron in HMS Ocean.

After exceeding the number of sorties allowed in Korea, Haines returned to Britain, where he flew with several squadrons in a number of roles, including that of test pilot.

His service files and logbooks record that he flew 1,473 hours with the Fleet Air Arm between 1949 and 1956 and carried out 332 deck landings on aircraft carriers. He suffered back pain for the rest of his life because of the pounding his body took. The only other injury he received was from playing rugby for the navy.

Carl Edward Haines was born in Hoo, Kent, in 1931. He was adopted as a child, but eventually became estranged from the family that brought him up. Later in life he was able to make contact with his birth mother and found that he had a half-sister named Joan.

He was generally regarded as a mischievous boy. During the Second World War, Carl and his friends could often be found searching for unexploded bombs and bullets. At other times he spent hours trainspotting.

Educated at the Headlands Secondary School in Swindon, Wiltshire, Carl took a strong interest in maths and history and was considered to be a bright boy. An avid reader, he also enjoyed sport and singing. He passed his school certificate in 1947.

Haines enlisted in the Fleet Air Arm, according to his son-in-law Rob Dodman, because he was “looking for independence, education and a career” after growing up admiring those who flew during the war.

He met his future wife, Doreen Humphreys, who was a factory worker, at a dance and sold his precious stamp collection to take her on their first date. They were married on the naval base while he was stationed at RNAS Culdrose on the Lizard Peninsula in the summer of 1951.

The couple had four daughters — Stephanie, who became an estate agent; Susan, who became an accountant; Felicity, an insurance executive and Victoria, who became a designer — as well as five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Doreen died in 2017 at the age of 87. Their daughters survive him.

After leaving the Fleet Air Arm in 1956, Haines ran a pub, the White Lion, in Wickham, Hampshire but then joined the Michelin tyre company at the start of a successful business career. He was later recruited by the Japanese tyre company Bridgestone to run their operations in Canada. He then moved to British Columbia with his family.

Towards the end of his career he took over as manager of the Tsawwassen Golf and Country Club near the city of Delta before retiring to Vancouver Island. Golf had been a great passion nearly all his adult life. His wife played too.

A resilient man with a lively sense of humour, Haines embraced retirement, enjoying long walks and gardening, playing bridge and entertaining friends. He had a distinctly sweet tooth and a taste for dark navy rum and chocolate. After moving into a communal residence, he insisted on wearing a dress shirt, jacket and naval tie in the dining room.

Elsewhere, the debate over the shooting-down of the MiG continued.

On July 1, 2017, the aviation historian Paul Beaver wrote an article in The Times under the headline: “Dogfight’s famous kill finally credited to rightful pilot”.

Beaver explained how research had revealed that the Royal Navy’s only “MiG killer” was in fact Ellis, not Carmichael, and provided a detailed account of the action. He also singled out the key role played by Haines, who had first seen the eight enemy jets.

In an earlier interview with the author Roland White, Ellis had said: “Carl saved us. He saw something move against a pale daylight moon, which gives you an idea of how sharp he was. If you want somebody who needs a lot of credit, there’s the first guy, because we immediately got into a pretty fair battle formation.”

When he returned to HMS Ocean, Haines completed the entry for the mission in his logbook, recording the destruction of the MiG and the damage inflicted on three others. In neat capital letters, he also wrote: “NUFF SAID!”

743926_20230614.jpg
743926_20230614.jpg (32.37 KiB) Viewed 423 times
https://www.legacy.com/ca/obituaries/de ... d=52239999

OneHungLow
Capt
Capt
Posts: 1866
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2023 8:28 pm
Location: Johannesburg
Gender:

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#365 Post by OneHungLow » Thu Aug 17, 2023 6:10 pm

FD2 wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2023 10:56 am
Carl Haines

Carl Haines obituary
Quick-sighted naval aviator who flew 175 missions during the Korean War and took part in one of the most famous dogfights in history

Thursday August 17 2023, 12.01am BST, The Times
Armed Forces


https://www.legacy.com/ca/obituaries/de ... d=52239999
What an interesting addition to this group of "forgotten" aviators...


https://www.aerosociety.com/news/sea-fu ... rue-story/
le parapluie de ma tante est cassé

OneHungLow
Capt
Capt
Posts: 1866
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2023 8:28 pm
Location: Johannesburg
Gender:

Rudolf Zima – One of the Few

#366 Post by OneHungLow » Sat Sep 16, 2023 8:53 am

Not all forgotten pilots noted here were aces, although many were brave men (and women) and one or two were rogues or villains. This Czech pilot definitely falls into the brave category. He was abominably treated back in Czechoslovakia after the war and suffered for his good service in the RAF due to the malign Soviet and communist influence.

Zima.JPG
Zima.JPG (26.91 KiB) Viewed 217 times
Battle of Britain:
On 6 August Edvard Beneš, the Czechoslovak President in Exile visited the squadron at Duxford and during the afternoon three Hurricanes gave him, and his entourage, a display of formation flying, led by F/Lr Jefferies and included Sgt Rudolf Zima and Sgt Hugo Hrbáček.

After rapid conversion to Hurricanes and some basic English lessons, taught by Louis de Glehn, the squadron was declared operational on 17 August and participated in the Battle of Britain. Rudolf completed his Hurricane conversion and was passed for duties as an operational pilot. He made his first operational flight in the Battle of Britain on 18 August. Flying Hurricane Mk I P8811 as Yellow 3 1 and led F/Lt Sinclair, Yellow 1, with Vaclav Bergman as Yellow 2 for a uneventful patrol, taking-off at 17:50 and returning to Duxford at 18:45.

Rudolf was to make a further 40 operation flights during the Battle of Britain period of 10 July 1940 to 31 October 1940. Whilst on several of these flights, Luftwaffe aircraft were engaged and combat success achieved by some of his fellow 310 Sqn pilots, but for Rudolf such success eluded him...

Rudolf’s operational flying came to an end on 7 March 1941. He was able to remain flying but now as an instructor. His first posting was to 52 OTU who were at Debden, then, on 3 May to Central Flying School at Watchfield. He received his commission, at the rank of P/O, on 16 June 1974 and was posted to 3 Elementary Flying School (3 EFTS) at Shellingford and on 13 May 1942 to 22 EFTS at Cambridge then back to 3 EFTS. Rudolf’s next promotion, to the rank of F/O, was on 22 July. On 7 October he was posted to Canada to 31 EFTS at the De Winton training centre at Alberta. His next posting was on 10 October to No 13 Service Flying Training School (13 SFTS) at North Battleford, in west-central Saskatchewan and on 28 of that month he was promoted to the rank of F/Lt.

With the war in Europe coming to a close, Rudolf was posted back to the UK and on 1 May 1945 and was posted to the Czechoslovak Depot at RAF Cosford. On 16 July he was posted to the Czechoslovak Inspectorate General, in London, and two days later returned to Prague to take up his post at the Czechoslovak Ministry of Defence, at the lower Czechoslovak Air Force rank of nadporučík.

Rudolf Zima, post WW2 Czechoslovak Air Force.

On his return to Czechoslovakia, he decided to remain in the Czechoslovak Air Force and that August was initially posted the Military Aviation Academy at Prostějov as a flying instructor and then to the Military Aviation Academy at Olomouc. Rudolf returned to Prostějov in January 1946 and on 1 July was appointed Commander of the Academy at the rank of štábní kapitán [S/Ldr].

Victim of Communism:

Following the Communist take-over in February 1948, the Czechoslovaks who fought for the Allies in WW2 were regarded as being tainted by capitalism and many were arrested, imprisoned and subjected to other persecution. In Rudolf’s case, at the beginning of February 1949 he was firstly placed on enforced leave, but on 10 March 1949 he was called back for active duty in Prostějov. However, in 1950 he was dismissed from the Czechoslovak Air Force and subjected to further intimidation. He found, like many of his former RAF colleagues who had also been similarly dismissed from the Czechoslovak Air Force, that nobody wanted to employ him because he had served in the RAF. Finally, despite his skills, he was only able to get menial work at the ironworks in Prostějov but due to medical reasons had to leave there in 1955.

On 21 August 1968, the Soviet Union led Warsaw Pact troops in an invasion of Czechoslovakia to crack down on reformist trends now developing under the ‘Prague Spring’ led by Alexander Dubček’s. In protest against that Soviet occupation, on 24 August 1968, Rudolf returned the Soviet War Medal he held for Victory over Germany.

He died in Prostějov on 11 June 1972, aged 68, and his ashes were placed in the family tomb at Jindřichov Hradec.

On 28 August 2010, a commemorative plaque was unveiled at Rudolf Zima’s birthplace in Jindřich Hradec. Following the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia in November 1989, he was promoted, in memoriam to the rank of Colonel in the Czechoslovak Air Force on 1 June 1991.
https://fcafa.com/2023/09/16/rudolf-zim ... f-the-few/
le parapluie de ma tante est cassé

OneHungLow
Capt
Capt
Posts: 1866
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2023 8:28 pm
Location: Johannesburg
Gender:

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights... Trygge Gran.

#367 Post by OneHungLow » Sat Sep 16, 2023 11:51 am

This chap ticked at least three of the following boxes...
Not all forgotten pilots noted here were aces, although many were brave men (and women) and one or two were rogues or villains
Tryggve Gran: Norwegian Adventurer Convicted of Treason
BY THEORKNEYNEWS ON NOVEMBER 8, 2022 •
The complex life of ‘born adventurer’, polar explorer, World War I air ace, and sentenced for treason in 1948, Tryggve Gran, was covered by Robert Foden in his illustrated online talk for the Orkney Aviation Festival.

Trygve Gran
Gran was married three times. Firstly, as "Teddy Grant, formerly Tryggve Gran" on 29 April 1918, in London, to actress Lily St. John (Lilian Clara Johnson) who later starred in The Naughty Princess... =))
In ‘You ought to take a Norwegian to show you’, Robert Foden recounted the extraordinary life of Trygge Gran.

Trygge Gran was born on 20th January 1888 in Bergen Norway into a rich shipping family. In 1900 he was sent to school in Switzerland where he learned to speak German and French.

Gran progressed through naval school and graduated in 1910. This was a time of the great Norwegian explorers especially Fridjof Nansen who introduced the young Gran to the British explorer Robert Scott in 1910. Scott was already planning his expedition to reach the South Pole and Nansen recommended Gran to him as a ski instructor.

The British Antarctic Expedition, led by Scott, landed at Cape Evans in 1911 with Gran the only Norwegian in the party. His diary, with passages read out in Robert Foden’s presentation, describes the way Gran felt about being in a British expedition when the Norwegian Roald Amundsen was racing to the South Pole ahead of them.

Gran was part of the search party which eventually found the bodies of Scott and his companions frozen to death in their tent having reached the Pole after Amundsen. Gran travelled back to base camp using Scott’s skis.

Trygge Gran was awarded the Polar Medal by King George V.

The next stop for any adventurer was in the rapidly developing technology of flight. Trained at the Bleriot Flight School in Paris, Gran was the first person to successfully cross the North Sea on 30th of July 1914 from Cruden Bay, Scotland to Jæren, near Stavanger, Norway, in a time of 4 hours and 10 minutes. The weather was so poor that for most of the flight he was only 100 feet above the sea.

As we know, in 1914 war broke out which was to envelop the world. Norway was neutral but Gran joined the Royal Flying Corps under the alias of Teddy Grant, a Canadian, as part of 39th Squadron. Gran was at this time a member of the Norwegian Flying Corps. His real identity was revealed and after resigning from the Norwegian service he rejoined the Royal Flying Corps under his real name. His exploits as an air ace included a ‘dog fight’ with German ace ‘Hermann Goering’, which he found out after the war when the two became friends.

For his courage during World War I, Trygge Gran was awarded the Military Cross.

Gran’s adventurous life continued after the war including being a member of the 1928 search party looking for Amundsen. Amundsen disappeared on 18 June 1928 while flying on a rescue mission for aeronautical engineer Umberto Nobile in the Arctic. The search for Amundsen and team was called off in September 1928 by the Norwegian government, and the bodies were never found.

On 9th of April 1940, the independent nation of Norway was invaded by Nazi Germany. This is covered in the excellent film, The King’s Choice. Gran was a member of Norway’s fascist party, the Nasjonal Samling, which was set up in a Quisling Government by the Nazis. After the war, trials were held and Gran was convicted of treason in 1948 for which he served an 18 month prison sentence.

Gran went on to write about his adventures and give lecture tours. In 1971 a memorial to his flight across the North Sea was unveiled in Cruden Bay. He died on 8th of January 1980, aged 91.

This fascinating talk by Robert Foden was done in his usual informative and entertaining way. Here is a link:


Aviators in the past had the makings of sterner stuff. One was Tryggve Gran, a 26-year-old Norwegian. He prepared for the first airborne crossing of the North Sea from a fishing village 25 miles north of Aberdeen. His Bleriot XI-2 monoplane, Ca Flotte, arrived in Cruden Bay on the back of a steam lorry. Four days before the beginning beginning of World War I, on the 30th of July 1914, he took off from a field outside the village. Forgetting the tram wires leading to the hotel and clearing them by a whisker, he coasted out. With only a clock, a compass and a keen sense of direction, his destination was Stavanger-Sola, Norway, 320 miles away. Seventy minutes into the flight, sea fog precludes further progress. Gran returned and landed on the beach, only stopping when he ran into the sea. Horses recovered the aircraft for another attempt. He left again at 1:00 pm. En route, the engine stops after leaving a fuel pump on by mistake. Putting the little plane into a dive, he air-starts the engine. Recovering 15 feet off the sea, he touches down 4 hours and ten minutes later in a field near Jaeren, not far from the present Stavanger-Sola airport. Leaving the engine running with a bemused farmer, he ran to telegraph the Daily Mail to announce his arrival and claim the prize for the first crossing. The farmer, who had never seen an aeroplane before, took the precaution of tethering it to a boulder. Ca Flotte can be seen in the Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, Oslo.
Oxenford, Andrew. Reflections of an Oil and Gas Helicopter Pilot (p. 21). Sabre & Quill.
le parapluie de ma tante est cassé

OneHungLow
Capt
Capt
Posts: 1866
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2023 8:28 pm
Location: Johannesburg
Gender:

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#368 Post by OneHungLow » Sat Sep 16, 2023 12:27 pm

le parapluie de ma tante est cassé

User avatar
CharlieOneSix
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 4748
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2015 12:58 pm
Location: NE Scotland
Gender:
Age: 78

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#369 Post by CharlieOneSix » Sat Sep 16, 2023 3:20 pm

A bit later but still Norwegian, three airmen managed to evade the Luftwaffe and bring their Norwegian Marinens Flyvebaatfabrikk M.F. 11 biplane across the North Sea to Stonehaven in May 1940.
MF11.jpg
Some local historians who gather in The Ship in Stonehaven recently decided to commemorate the event with the assistance of a local sculptor and the result is a stainless steel model of the aircraft placed on the coastal boardwalk:
MF11-2.jpg
The helicopter pilots' mantra: If it hasn't gone wrong then it's just about to...
https://www.glenbervie-weather.org

Karearea
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 3929
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2015 5:47 am
Location: South Island, New Zealand

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights... Trygge Gran.

#370 Post by Karearea » Sat Sep 16, 2023 6:14 pm

OneHungLow wrote:
Sat Sep 16, 2023 11:51 am

... In ‘You ought to take a Norwegian to show you’, Robert Foden recounted the extraordinary life of Trygge Gran. ...
Very interesting - thank you, OHL.

From the credits of that video, "No aircraft were harmed during the making of this production" :-bd
"And to think that it's the same dear old Moon..."

User avatar
FD2
Chief Pilot
Chief Pilot
Posts: 4884
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:11 pm
Location: New Zealand
Gender:
Age: 76

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights...

#371 Post by FD2 » Sat Sep 16, 2023 8:14 pm

Amazing man. Stonehaven looks more like it was taken in Victorian times!

I love that model - accurate with a touch of steam punk. I hope is doesn't get damaged.

OneHungLow
Capt
Capt
Posts: 1866
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2023 8:28 pm
Location: Johannesburg
Gender:

Re: Forgotten pilots or flights... Flt Lt Jeffrey Glover

#372 Post by OneHungLow » Sat Sep 23, 2023 10:26 am

I was talking to an Argentinian rugby supporter and aviation nut the other day and the conversation, Lord knows how, erred onto the subject of the Falklands war (don't mention the war) and he disagreed with me on a number of points but we parted amicably nonetheless. However I did check later to see how many British aircraft were lost due to any cause during the war.

https://www.naval-history.net/F63-Falkl ... r%20combat.

I see that 10 Harriers were lost due to accidents or groundfire, and that none were lost due to air to air combat. I also note that one pilot became a POW. I had never been aware of this fact.

Falklands Harrier.JPG

Text below the image is erroneous but I have left it in to note the names of all of his fellow pilots.


https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/falkland ... apes%20low.

On the morning of 21 May 1982, Flt Lt Jeffrey Glover was flying a Harrier GR.3 of 1(F) Squadron, RAF, (XZ972 -tail code 33) operating from HMS Hermes on a reconnaissance mission.

He was shot down at around 9.35am by a Shorts Blowpipe man-portable surface to air missile over Port Howard, West Falklands and ejected.

His story is briefly told here.

https://www.lordashcroftonbravery.com/w ... UN2022.pdf

Brave men all of them. They should not be forgotten
le parapluie de ma tante est cassé

Post Reply