The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

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The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#1 Post by Cacophonix » Fri Feb 01, 2019 9:22 am

It seems our masters and airspace overlords have put down their whizwheels and have noticed that the world has moved on. Who knows, next they will advise that this new fangled tinterweb thing can provide online Metars, TAF's etc. online... =))
Analysis of 2017’s airspace infringement reports from private pilots has shown that that correct use of a moving map could have helped avoid 85% of airspace infringements.

Pilot reports were assessed against four measures that could have helped prevent the infringement or reduced its impact on other air traffic or controllers.

Analysis of 2017’s airspace infringement reports from private pilots has shown that that correct use of a moving map could have helped avoid 85% of airspace infringements.

Pilot reports were assessed against four measures that could have helped prevent the infringement or reduced its impact on other air traffic or controllers.

Key findings suggest that:
  • The correct use of a moving map could have prevented 85% of infringements
  • Correct use of a frequency monitoring code (also known as a listening squawk) could have prevented 65% of infringements
  • Recognition of/dealing with overload, fixation and distraction – possibly effective in 43% of cases
  • Better familiarity with aircraft and equipment – possibly effective in 24% of cases
Rob Gratton, chair of the Airspace Infringement Working Group said: “The CAA actively promotes the use of GPS moving map technology as a mitigation against airspace infringements. But pilots must ensure that they are using the application and device correctly.”

The report was carried out by a sub-group of the CAA’s Airspace Infringement Working Group, made up of three experienced General Aviation pilots.
In 2017 there were a total on 1165 airspace infringements reported through Mandatory Occurrence Report (MOR) or Alleged Breach of Air Navigation Legislation (ABANL) reports. Of these, 307 were investigated by the CAA’s Infringement Coordination Group. Full report on 2017-2018 infringements

Read the full report here: https://airspacesafety.com/facts-stats-and-incidents/
https://www.flyer.co.uk/use-a-moving-ma ... nging-caa/


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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#2 Post by Undried Plum » Fri Feb 01, 2019 5:42 pm

Learning how to fekkin navigate would be a really good alternative to being dependent on a mobile phone/tablet.

Read the fekkin map; compare it to what you see on the ground; rinse; repeat.

Fit that routine in the appropriate space between the tryptic of Aviate; Navigate; Communicate:- and you won't go far wrong.

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#3 Post by Pontius Navigator » Fri Feb 01, 2019 5:54 pm

UP, I once reported a civvie for low flying. He committed the sin of making multiple passes in time for me to get my camera.. He was photographing houses for speculative sales.

The CAA man handling my complaint had been a Wellington navigator.

They traced the aircraft to Leeds, its owner was in Spain, and they could not prove the son was the pilot. I still remember dark hair, sunglasses and white shirt.

He was subsequently killed when he collided with the Jaguar with John Mardon in the back of the Jag on his first flight after a heart bypass.

Had they been more effective 3 people would not have died.

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=i&sourc ... 0220850671

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#4 Post by Cacophonix » Fri Feb 01, 2019 9:23 pm

Undried Plum wrote:
Fri Feb 01, 2019 5:42 pm
Learning how to fekkin navigate would be a really good alternative to being dependent on a mobile phone/tablet.

Read the fekkin map; compare it to what you see on the ground; rinse; repeat.

Fit that routine in the appropriate space between the tryptic of Aviate; Navigate; Communicate:- and you won't go far wrong.
VFR navigation cross country using tangible visual turning points, tracking in straight lines between such points, using a whisky compass, a watch and a chart and taking account of drift is easy.

Flying around imaginary curved lines iin the air, not delineated by visual reference points in narrow traffic congested corridors between Stansted and Luton , around Farnborough and in the Southend area is not so easy. Why not use the new technology if it can help in such situations and avoid controlled airspace violations, CAA enforcement actions or worse? Use all tools at your disposal I say if they can facilitate and expedite safer aviation.

As for instrument flight, as VOR's and NDB approaches are replaced , the use of GPS becomes de riigueur in the case of new RNAV approaches vide.

Stapleford Instrument Approach

Stapleford Aerodrome in northeast London is proposing a GPS instrument approach to its main runway, RWY21L. It has launched a consultation which ends on 26 March 2018. The consultation document can be downloaded here.

The proposal is mainly to allow Stapleford Flight Centre (SFC) to continue instrument training when the nearby Lambourn VOR is withdrawn in the next two years. However, it will be of benefit to all General Aviation pilots flying IFR.

“If our proposal is approved, the implementation of the instrument approach will allow approaches to the aerodrome when the weather is poor (e.g. low cloud base or visibility) and improve the safety of operations during deteriorating weather conditions,” says Stapleford.

“Currently, there is no approved Instrument approach to Stapleford and aircraft intending to land at the aerodrome have to divert to another aerodrome if they are unable to see the runway.

“The proposed instrument approach will allow SFC to continue local instrument approach training following the withdrawal of the LAM VOR. Without any facility to support instrument approach training at Stapleford, such as the VOR or the proposed procedure, all instrument approach training would have to be conducted at an alternative airport, increasing costs.”

The aerodrome has received a grant from the European GNSS Agency to support the implementation and is working with the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) and aviation consultancy Helios.

The total number of movements at the airport was 40,000 in 2016, of which 35,000 movements were operated by SFC. Approximately 80% of flights utilised runway 21L, which represents 32,000 movements.

FLYER comment: to put this proposal into context:

There’s a dearth of General Aviation Instrument Approaches (IAPs) around London, with Biggin Hill really being the only option. Other than that it means going to Oxford or Southend, and neither are really London.

This is a visible sign of the desire by many, including EASA and ESA, to get instrument approaches to every suitable runway end.

The UK is way behind places like France and the US on GPS approaches (really called RNAV approaches now, but same thing).

If it happens, then Stapleford should be a shining example of having an approach without full ATC.
https://www.flyer.co.uk/gps-instrument- ... tapleford/

I still do all my VFR planning using my CRP-5 and a chart and chinagraph pencil and kneel at the altar of the 1 in 60 rule but the times and the air space are changing fast.

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#5 Post by ExSp33db1rd » Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:37 pm

Commenting on my onetime experience as a Navigator, was recently interrupted by an aspiring PPL student, who took his eyes off his Smartphone for 10 seconds to say - What's a sextant ?

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#6 Post by Cacophonix » Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:46 am

ExSp33db1rd wrote:
Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:37 pm
Commenting on my onetime experience as a Navigator, was recently interrupted by an aspiring PPL student, who took his eyes off his Smartphone for 10 seconds to say - What's a sextant ?
I think aviation would be well served if flying clubs, schools etc. had extracurricular sessions on subjects like the history of navigation, safety sessions with the CAA, trips to the guild of navigators etc.

My personal interest in sextants and astro navigation was sparked by my time in the boy scouts in South Africa where one of the fathers, , an Englishman and ex RAF navigator then flying as a flight engineer (soon to be made redundant again unfortunately) with Luxair introduced us to the sextant, the Silva compass and the sextant, not least so that some of us ccould complete our twenty miles night hike through the Cape Mountains, alone, aided by reference to the stars alone. He even took us to the planetarium! Fascinating stuff and relevant and remembered for a lifetime.

As a postscript, our tutor left aviation and became an artist and an art dealer, living in Rome when last heard of. There was a certain symmetry to his career as a navigator, as navigation is as much an art as a science.


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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#7 Post by Cacophonix » Sat Feb 02, 2019 6:14 am

unfortunately) with Luxair introduced us to the sextant, the Silva compass

To the stars rather! Too many sextants are bad for you.

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#8 Post by ExSp33db1rd » Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:29 am

Quote ..
I think aviation would be well served if flying clubs, schools etc. had extracurricular sessions on subjects like the history of navigation, safety sessions with the CAA, trips to the guild of navigators etc.
Funny you should mention that, yesterday I was telephoned by the local Hon. Sec. of the " University of the 3rd Age "( ! ) and asked if I would be prepared to give them a talk about aviation navigation before the invention of GPS and iPads ? I have agreed, tho' it might actually be next year before a mutually available date can be arranged -gives me time to refresh my aged memory about Spherical Trig, Siderial Hour Angle and the like ! (must see if there is anyone who can help me create a PowerPoint presentation, not something I have ever tackled. ) Unfortunately I sent my 1958 BOAC course notes about Astro Navigation to the British Airways Museum at Hatton Cross a couple of years ago. The barstewards never even thanked me ! Fortunately long term memory isn't as much a problem as short term memory these days, like where did I put the screwdriver that I put down momentarily ? I guess Giggle is my friend, anyway.

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#9 Post by Undried Plum » Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:18 am

I think GPS is one of the greatest inventions of mankind. A truly brilliant tool.

It's so sad, however, that it spells the demise of the old skills of what we formerly thought of as being 'proper' Navigation.

I take great pride and pleasure in being able to navigate the 'old' ways. Ashore, I know how to measure position by the stars using my trusty old Wild T3 theodolite. I keep a running tally of LoPs of Astro observations of a peg in front of my house. Hundreds and hundreds of readings now, all converging on the "True" value. Of course I know that my mobile phone can give me data which is much more more accurate, but there's no pleasure in that. No satisfaction.

As for the CAA, I think they need to get the thumb out of their arse. Perhaps the demise of that football kicker will jolt them awake by public pressure, perhaps not.

Perhaps withdrawal of the ability to hive off their responsibilities onto the very narrow backs of the EUrocrats of EASA will bring them back to useful life. Perhaps not. If the sound of their own snoring doesn't wake them, perhaps nothing will. Dozy bastards.

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#10 Post by Cacophonix » Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:39 am

Undried Plum wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:18 am
I think GPS is one of the greatest inventions of mankind. A truly brilliant tool.

It's so sad, however, that it spells the demise of the old skills of what we formerly thought of as being 'proper' Navigation.

I take great pride and pleasure in being able to navigate the 'old' ways. Ashore, I know how to measure position by the stars using my trusty old Wild T3 theodolite. I keep a running tally of LoPs of Astro observations of a peg in front of my house. Hundreds and hundreds of readings now, all converging on the "True" value. Of course I know that my mobile phone can give me data which is much more more accurate, but there's no pleasure in that. No satisfaction.

As for the CAA, I think they need to get the thumb out of their arse. Perhaps the demise of that football kicker will jolt them awake by public pressure, perhaps not.

Perhaps withdrawal of the ability to hive off their responsibilities onto the very narrow backs of the EUrocrats of EASA will bring them back to useful life. Perhaps not. If the sound of their own snoring doesn't wake them, perhaps nothing will. Dozy bastards.

Agree with all you say here Undried Plum. I also worry that one day, some technological disaster or worse, will leave us bereft of our GPS crutch, and then, literally "where will be then?"

I am still amazed at the ability of the Pacific islanders who set off in canoes and using nothing but their nous, knowledge of the currents, nature and the stars could navigate the mighty pacific from island to island out into terra incognita.

Judging by your comments and experience, you are the man to collaborate with ExSp33dB1rd in the definition of the PowerPoint slides for the University of the 3rd Age (or was it Eye?).


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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#11 Post by Undried Plum » Sat Feb 02, 2019 10:19 am

In the 1970s I enjoyed membership of a flying club in which a leading member was an ex Bomber Command Nav. He served/survived two tours on Lancs and one on Mozzies. 90+ trips sausageside. That takes skill over luck.

He gave winter evening lectures which I greatly enjoyed. He taught me more about practical Nav/Met than I ever learned at Cranditz in pilot training.

Those old skills are decaying through a process of atrophy. That's a pity.

The CAA, meanwhile, has been destroyed through a grim and grinding process of Thathcherism.

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#12 Post by ian16th » Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:04 am

I have memories of having lectures from a Valiant navigator at Marham, that included a 3 bearing fix, a running fix and doubling the angle of the bow.

This was all free to members of the RAF Marham Sailing Club!

We all simply took it all for granted that we had a professional available to give his time.
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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#13 Post by ExSp33db1rd » Sun Feb 03, 2019 1:59 am

........member was an ex Bomber Command Nav.
One of my Nav. instructors was one of those. He once told me that I'd never make a navigator until I'd been over Berlin with the shells coming through the cockpit as I tried to take drift readings from 3 different headings through the driftsight, to calculate the heading home. I never had to do that.

I must confess that I had similar thoughts watching my students grapple with the sextant in later years, then along came INS and they didn't have to do that, either.

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Re: The UK CAA joins the 21st century, probably!

#14 Post by llondel » Sun Feb 03, 2019 6:06 am

Undried Plum wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:18 am
I think GPS is one of the greatest inventions of mankind. A truly brilliant tool.

It's so sad, however, that it spells the demise of the old skills of what we formerly thought of as being 'proper' Navigation.
An experience ten years ago shows how technology stops us learning stuff. I was on a temporary job in the US and my employer was paying for a rental car. The first one, which we had for a couple of months, had built-in satnav and after using it for a couple of months my wife and I realised that we didn't actually know where anything was because we just followed directions. After that light bulb moment we made more of an effort to learn the map.

I habitually engage Google Maps every morning now to get to work, not because I need directions on how to get there, but to gather information as to which route is best given prevailing traffic conditions and get warnings should that change while en route.

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