Skydiving.

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Undried Plum
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Re: Skydiving.

#41 Post by Undried Plum » Tue Apr 26, 2022 10:09 pm

PHXPhlyer wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 2:21 pm

The aircraft seemed to be registered in the Experimental Category which would cover speedbrake, oversized tires, missing door, etc.

Does that cover silliness?

Can you do stoopid things on a Cessna, like put a tipoverarseovertit airbrake for commercial purposes, and get away with it?

Is there a Barney & Bailey Law yet?

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Re: Skydiving.

#42 Post by Ex-Ascot » Wed Apr 27, 2022 11:42 am

Boac wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 4:30 pm
Which one was the 'driver' of the crashed aircraft? Should keep the lawyers busy for $0000's
I think that they are both in the ***** for leaving their aircraft unmanned. Maybe Red Bull also as the organisers.
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Re: Skydiving.

#43 Post by PHXPhlyer » Fri Apr 29, 2022 9:54 pm

Pilot in botched Arizona Red Bull plane stunt apologizes

https://news.yahoo.com/pilot-botched-ar ... 30109.html

ELOY, Ariz. (AP) — The pilot in charge during a forbidden Red Bull plane-swapping stunt said Friday he takes full responsibility for the ensuing crash over the Arizona desert.

Luke Aikins, the lead pilot, admitted in a post on his Instagram that he disregarded a denial from the Federal Aviation Administration two days before Sunday's mid-air crash.

“I made the personal decision to move forward with (the) plane swap. I regret not sharing this information with my team and those who supported me,” Aikins wrote.

He said he would cooperate fully with the FAA and any other regulatory agencies.

Aikins and another pilot flew separate single-engine Cessna 182 airplanes up to 14,000 feet (4 kilometers) Sunday evening as part of a stunt to promote the energy drink company. They tried to switch planes as the aircraft descended.

One plane spun out of control and crashed near Eloy, roughly 65 miles (104 kilometers) southeast of Phoenix. The pilot was able to parachute out safely. The second pilot regained control of the other plane and landed safely.

It was not clear what possible penalties Aikins could face. Elizabeth Isham Cory, an FAA spokeswoman, said the agency does not comment on open investigations. But the FAA provided a copy of a letter denying Aikins' request.

Aikins had petitioned for an exemption from the rule that pilots must be at the helm with safety belts fastened at all times. He argued the stunt would “be in the public interest because it would promote aviation in science, technology, engineering and math.”

Robert Carty, FAA deputy executive director of flight standards service, denied the exemption.

Red Bull, known for organizing wild promotional stunts, said in a statement it looks forward to continuing to work with Aikins. The company called him a “courageous, highly skilled athlete” who has been honest about his role in the incident.

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Re: Skydiving.

#44 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Sat Apr 30, 2022 7:18 am

A pilot in his 20s climbs into an airplane and takes off to perform a record-setting stunt that is sure to impress his millions of followers. The plot so far might bear a current-day familiarity, but in this case, the year is 1914 and the pilot is Lincoln Beachey.

Beachey was a pioneer of aerial demonstrations and aerobatics during aviation’s first decade and became wealthy by testing his aircraft’s limits while thrilling airshow audiences.

READ MORE: Aviation Stunts: A History Lesson - https://www.flyingmag.com/aviation-stun ... ry-lesson/

“There is a correlation between Beachey and people who perform aerial stunts today to gain views on YouTube,” says Willie Turner, vice president of operations and marketing at the Hiller Aviation Museum in San Carlos, California, where Beachey’s original Little Looper biplane is on display. “They are all entertaining the audience to an extreme level,” he says.

But aviation regulations and enforcement have changed in the last 100-plus years. Society’s expectations regarding safety have also evolved, so today’s stunt pilots cannot expect the level of freedom and permissiveness that Beachey enjoyed.

Indeed, the FAA quickly announced investigations of the team that organized and performed last weekend’s Red Bull Plane Swap, and of Trevor Jacob, the former Olympic snowboarder and YouTuber who allegedly crashed his aircraft intentionally last November. The agency later revoked Jacob’s pilot certificate.

Many people have expressed concern online and elsewhere that the FAA might need to change its regulatory approach to properly address what looks to some like a trend toward increasingly dangerous flying in a quest for views, likes, and comments on social media.

William Voss, a pilot and former FAA official, says the agency’s regulations are “very clear,” but that in some cases, the options for enforcement are less so because “there is no clear category” for the types of violations that arise from certain types of stunts, especially when the pilots perform them without permission and choose to disobey regulations. Some of the fines the FAA charges for violations, for example, may be too low to be a deterrent and “a little bit out of date,” Voss says.

“People have gotten better at monetizing social media. They make the calculations and realize they can make more money than they lose by getting the views and paying a fine.”

Voss says the FAA has to be careful about how it treats the Red Bull case. “Unless there is a firm response to this, people might get the message that you can do crazy things with airplanes and get away with it.”

“People have gotten better at monetizing social media. They make the calculations and realize they can make more money than they lose by getting the views and paying a fine.”

Regarding the Red Bull case, the FAA said, “We investigate each incident based on the specific circumstances and take the appropriate steps based on what the evidence tells us.”

The agency declined to comment further, however, it released the letter it sent to Plane Swap pilot Luke Aikins. It explains that the Red Bull group requested an exemption from a regulation that essentially requires pilots to be strapped into seats and flying the plane unless they are performing other necessary duties. The letter also states why the agency denied the request.

In the letter, Robert C. Carty, the FAA’s deputy executive director of its flight standards service, says, “The proposed exemption, if granted, would authorize Luke Aikins and Andy Farrington to depart the flight deck and attempt to swap aircraft in-flight while both aircraft are at vertical dive. During the swap, both aircraft will be unoccupied.

The regulation, section 91.105(a) “prescribes that during takeoff and landing, and while en route, each required flight crewmember shall (1) be at the crewmember station unless the absence is necessary to perform duties in connection with the operation of the aircraft or in connection with physiological needs; and (2) keep the safety belt fastened while at the crewmember station,” the FAA letter states.

While the Red Bull request refers to the plane swap as part of a project in the public interest that promotes aviation in science, technology, engineering, and math, the agency, in denying the request, says it finds no such public interest.
https://www.flyingmag.com/does-the-faa- ... media-age/

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Re: Skydiving.

#45 Post by TheGreenGoblin » Sat Apr 30, 2022 8:08 am

Though you remain
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Re: Skydiving.

#46 Post by PHXPhlyer » Thu May 12, 2022 6:52 pm

FAA suspends licenses of two pilots involved in failed Red Bull stunt
The pilots showed “careless or reckless manner so as to endanger the life or property of another” during the failed mid-air swap on April 24, over Arizona, the FAA said.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/fa ... -rcna28506

The Federal Aviation Administration revoked the licenses of two pilots for their "careless" and "reckless" conduct during a failed mid-air stunt last month in Arizona, officials said this week.

No one was injured on April 24 when daredevil pilots Luke Aikins and Andy Farrington tried jumping out of separate planes into the other crafts to land them.

“The FAA revoked the pilot certificates of the two pilots involved in the unauthorized Red Bull plane swap stunt on April 24, 2022, in Arizona,” according to the FAA statement.

“The attempted stunt resulted in the crash of one of the two single-engine Cessna 182 aircraft. The lead pilot requested an exemption for the stunt from the FAA, which the agency denied."

The pair had attempted to send their Cessna 182 planes into synchronized nosedives at 14,000 feet before jumping out to switch aircraft.

The planes were supposed to fall in tandem allowing Aikins and Farrington, who are also skydivers, the time to jump from their planes and into the other crafts in a stunt that Red Bull billed as a "world first" and which was livestreamed on Hulu.

But one of the planes spiraled out of control and crashed in Eloy, Arizona, leading only to Aikins getting in the other craft while Farrington was forced to parachute.

Both the FAA and the stunt's lead pilot, Aikins, said the attempt could have only gone forward with the agency granting an exemption.

But days after the failed stunt, Aikins admitted, in a statement posted on Instagram, that his request to the FAA had been denied — and he went ahead with it anyway.

The FAA denial came on April 22 and Aikins said he "made the personal decision to move forward with the plane swap."

"I regret not sharing this information with my team and those who supported me," Aikins continued. "I am now turning my attention to cooperatively working transparently with the regulatory authorities as we review the planning and execution."

In notices sent to the two pilots on Tuesday, informing them of emergency revocation of their licenses, the FAA told both airmen they were "careless or reckless manner so as to endanger the life or property of another" during the April 24 stunt.

The pilots could apply for reinstatement in one year.

Aikins, who was also fined $4,932, and a representative of Red Bull could not be immediately reached for comment on Thursday. It's unclear if Farrington was fined.

"Right now we're not available to comment on that, but hopefully we will be able to soon," Farrington told NBC News on Thursday.

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Re: Skydiving.

#47 Post by Ex-Ascot » Fri May 13, 2022 7:52 am

Good.
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Re: Skydiving.

#48 Post by Ex-Ascot » Tue Aug 02, 2022 6:04 am

This was obviously a AFF (accelerated free fall) course. You should have an instructor either side to stabilise you so that this doesn't happen. Also an instructor will pull your chute release for you if you fail to do it in time. A huge instructor cock up. I have dropped hundreds of these, never a problem.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... illed.html
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Re: Skydiving.

#49 Post by Fox3WheresMyBanana » Tue Aug 02, 2022 12:36 pm

I did the AFF.
There are two instructors for the first three jumps, then only one for the next four. The report says it was the student's third jump, which if correct means there should have been two instructors. This would be a critical failure if true.
The student fails to find his pull handle on the first attempt, and the instructor places his hand on it. This is the correct action by the instructor. However, my recollection is that the student must then repeat the exercise correctly, unassisted, before the next element. It's why the student is still required to be held at this point. The failure of the instructor to require the unassisted repeat is ultimately the critical failure.
The next element is turning. The student makes the first small turns adequately, then loses stability. Shortly after, the student appears to have forgotten everything he's been taught by ending up inverted. The instructor attempts to recapture the student but fails, I think for understandable reasons.
I would question also the jump from 6,500 feet. I do not see how the student has any margin for repeating elements, or sufficient time for the student to recover from early errors, or for the instructor to recapture them if necessary. I did my course at what was then the most professional place in the World. We jumped from 15,000 ft, and the student had to pull at 5,000 ft for the first three jumps to provide an adequate safety margin for everything mentioned above.
There is also the cost factor. Failing any element of each of the seven accompanied jumps means that whole jump must be repeated, at the student's expense. Budget-conscious operations will be tempted to pass students when they shouldn't.

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Re: Skydiving.

#50 Post by Ex-Ascot » Tue Aug 02, 2022 1:23 pm

All correct as I recall Fox. Not exactly sure from the video of the drop height. We used to drop at 10,000 for them. Do you think that this is 10,000 I don't think so.

So what is the most professional place in the world? I think RAFSPA were pretty good. Not that I or Mrs Ex-Ascot would ever accept their constant offers of free courses.
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Re: Skydiving.

#51 Post by Fox3WheresMyBanana » Tue Aug 02, 2022 2:07 pm

About 20 years ago, I think it was Skydive Space Centre at Titusville, FL. Everything was brand new. Their chief rigger, who taught me to pack, was the ex-rigger for the Golden Knights. I did a four-way and six-way with a team who became next year's World Champions, etc. My AFF instruction was excellent, and I couldn't fault their aircraft ops either. I couldn't say they were technically better than RAFSPA, having never jumped anywhere else, but several of the guys had jumped at both places and they preferred SSC.

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Re: Skydiving.

#52 Post by llondel » Tue Aug 02, 2022 3:37 pm

Makes my one departure on a static line quite tame. Although in those days you didn't jump tandem, you were on your own.

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Re: Skydiving.

#53 Post by Fox3WheresMyBanana » Tue Aug 02, 2022 4:16 pm

The crowd at SSC were universally friendly, whether you'd done one static line jump or 10,000+ skydives. You are not a whuffo.
Frankly, I was a lot happier to be pulling my own ripcord, and landing under something that performed like a wing, than that dangerous static line stuff!
They weren't superior in any way. Indeed, they asked me to help their instructors with their teaching technique for water landings, done in a pool, since the RAF had kindly thrown me into the sea a few times and dumped a parachute on top, which was more than their instructors had actually done.

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Re: Skydiving.

#54 Post by PHXPhlyer » Wed Aug 03, 2022 8:15 pm

Video: Paraglider barely avoids death after parachute gets tangled, backup doesn't open

https://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/parag ... oesnt-open#



Video: Paraglider barely avoids death after getting tangled parachute
A paraglider in Spain escaped with his life just seconds before he plummeted to the ground after he got tangled in his lines during a trip while "acro-paragliding". Credit: Kevin Philipp via Storyful

ORGANYA, Spain - A paraglider is lucky to be alive after his parachute tangled up moments after he deployed it.

Kevin Philipp shared the heart-stopping footage of the incident on YouTube.

In the video caption, he explained that was set to perform an acro-paragliding trick in Organya, Spain during strong turbulence, but things went wrong.

His brake line got stuck.

In the video, you see his quick descent from the sky as Philipp's parachute lines tangle around him. He's then forced to deploy his rescue parachute, but it fails to open and wraps around him.

parachute tangles near death
"Falling into the lines and wing made the rescue parachute throw quite hard. The falling speed increased a lot due to the twisting wing," Philipp wrote in the caption.

He added that with just one second to spare before he meets the ground, Philipp is able to manually open his rescue chute.
The small orange parachute helps him land more slowly and safely just seconds later.

"This was not the day to die!" Philipp wrote. "This occasion is quite unlucky and rare. Just to keep in mind. Fly high, land safe."

According to the U.S. Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association (USHPA), paragliders fly lightweight aircraft that have no rigid primary structure and resemble elliptical parachutes. They sit in a harness suspended below a fabric wing that consists of many interconnected baffled cells. They can travel hundreds of miles on thermals, soar for hours in winds pushed upward by coastal terrain, or simply fly down from a mountain in calm, still air.

In 2020, there were three recorded paragliding deaths in the U.S.

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Re: Skydiving.

#55 Post by Fox3WheresMyBanana » Wed Aug 03, 2022 8:27 pm

In Florida, I met a skydiving mom who used to bring her 16yo son skydiving with her. She said it was safer than leaving him to hang out in Miami with his schoolmates.
Intrigued, I checked the stats later, and she was correct.

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Re: Skydiving.

#56 Post by Ex-Ascot » Thu Aug 25, 2022 12:54 pm

Good on her can't see a problem with it.

https://www.whitchurchherald.co.uk/news ... t-skydive/
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Re: Skydiving.

#57 Post by Ex-Ascot » Tue Oct 18, 2022 11:41 am

'Yes, Madam, I am drunk, but in the morning I shall be sober and you will still be ugly.' Sir Winston Churchill.

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Re: Skydiving.

#58 Post by TheGreenAnger » Tue Oct 18, 2022 1:58 pm

Ex-Ascot wrote:
Tue Oct 18, 2022 11:41 am
Unfortunate accident.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... lines.html
Stalled performance chute. Seems like the poor chap that was killed was very experienced. Unfortunate accident.

Not like the old T-10 chutes (old gore) from the dark ages where the chute definitely wasn't a wing.
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Re: Skydiving.

#59 Post by Ex-Ascot » Sun Nov 06, 2022 1:15 pm

An incredible display. Congratulations Ladies.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... nship.html
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Re: Skydiving.

#60 Post by PHXPhlyer » Sun Nov 06, 2022 5:45 pm

Ex-Ascot wrote:
Sun Nov 06, 2022 1:15 pm
An incredible display. Congratulations Ladies.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... nship.html
Impressive.
However. Seems a bit to frantic for me. :-?

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