More Boeing Bad News

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Re: More Boeing Bad News

#441 Post by boing » Wed Jul 01, 2020 7:36 pm

And Boeing continues to pour money down a rat-hole.

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Re: More Boeing Bad News

#442 Post by PHXPhlyer » Wed Jul 08, 2020 5:27 pm

Don't expect to fly on a Boeing 737 Max anytime soon

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/08/business ... index.html

Don't expect to fly on a Boeing 737 Max anytime soon
Chris Isidore byline
By Chris Isidore, CNN Business


How the pandemic is changing the way we fly
New York (CNN Business)More than 15 months after its best-selling plane was grounded, Boeing is finally close to getting approval to fly passengers on the 737 Max again.

But don't expect to see any of those passengers on board until late this year, at best.
The plane was grounded in March 2019 after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Boeing has been working on fixing the automatic safety feature that malfunctioned and forced the nose of both planes down, causing the crashes. But Boeing has missed deadline after deadline to win regulatory approval along the way. Its most recent target -- approval by the middle of this year -- is now here. So are the test flights that are one of the final steps needed for clearance.
With that history of missed deadlines, neither the Federal Aviation Administration nor Boeing will say when the plane will be approved to fly passengers again. The airlines have indicated they aren't planning on flying the plane until late this year, at the earliest.
Experts say that's a relatively safe bet. "It'll take several months, easily, to deal with the training and fixes," said Richard Aboulafia, aerospace analyst with the Teal Group. "The Covid-19 situation will hobble the process a little bit. A couple of days before Thanksgiving is my bet for when it flies."
A long approval process
Pilots from the FAA started test flights with the plane last week and are continuing those tests this week. Once the agency is satisfied, it could give relatively quick clearance for the plane. But that's only the start, not the end.
Boeing will then need to get approval from other aviation regulators around the globe -- a crucial step, since most of the 387 planes that have already been delivered are in the hands of overseas carriers.
Next Boeing will need to start making repairs on those grounded planes, as well as the more than 400 planes it has built during the grounding which have yet to be delivered.
And it's not just the safety features that need to be repaired. During this process, problems with the Max's wiring system were also discovered. Boeing will need to fix that, too.
"Boeing has already begun modifying [the wiring of] airplanes that have not yet been delivered and is coordinating modification efforts with the airlines," the company said. "New airplanes being built will include this update as well."
Pilots will need to spend significant amounts of time in simulators and training, as they must know how to respond if the safety system is triggered. The investigations have raised questions about whether the pilots had enough training when they moved from an earlier version of the 737 to the Max.
A perilous time for aviation
The biggest change in circumstance is that the Covid-19 pandemic, and the resulting collapse of demand for air travel has grounded many of the planes around the globe, including a large percentage of the earlier versions of the 737 jets.
Huge losses have prompted many airlines to cancel orders for jets to save costs. Boeing has reported 313 canceled orders for the Max, and that doesn't include orders for 92 of the planes announced recently by Norwegian Air Shuttle.
Boeing kept building the 737 Max after the grounding, even though it wasn't able to deliver it. But as the approval process stretched on, it couldn't afford to keep doing that because most of the money it gets for the jets comes at the time of delivery. After pausing production in January just before the Covid-19 outbreak started causing widespread problems for airlines, Boeing is again building the 737 Max, albeit at a slower pace.
The canceled orders and the coronavirus pandemic, from which air travel could take years to recover, have caused the company to cut back its production schedule for all of its jets. It is in the process of cutting 10% of its staff, 16,000 jobs, in response to the slowdown.
Demand for the plane isn't as great as when airlines were filling most of their seats with paying passengers as recently as the end of last year.

"We have too many airplanes right now," said Southwest CEO Gary Kelly at the company's shareholder meeting last month talking about the outlook for a return to service for the Max. Southwest flies nothing but 737 jets.
Southwest (LUV) hasn't canceled any of the orders it has for 280 of the jets, though it has pushed back the orders for planes that had been scheduled for delivery by 2021. It had 34 of the planes in its fleet at the time of the grounding, the most of any airline.
But Kelly said he would like to see the 737 Max planes it owns in service carrying passengers sooner rather than later, along with those that Boeing has already built for it but has yet to deliver.
"The Max airplane is superior to the ...[version of the] 737 that we're currently operating. It burns less fuel. It's an excellent airplane. And certainly in this environment, we would love to retire some of our older aircraft, avoid some expensive maintenance and a substitute with the newer airplanes."
Getting approval for the jet to fly passengers again is important to both Boeing and its airline customers. But in the time of the pandemic and the worst crisis in memory for the global aviation industry, it's just not as important as it seemed at the start of this year.
-- CNN's Gregory Wallace contributed to this report

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Re: More Boeing Bad News

#443 Post by PHXPhlyer » Wed Jul 22, 2020 4:52 pm

Boeing 737 MAX Likely to Remain Grounded Through to 2021

https://www.thestreet.com/investing/boe ... elays-2021

Boeing 737 MAX Likely to Remain Grounded Through to 2021
Boeing’s currently grounded 737 MAX isn’t likely to be put back into widespread use until at least early next year amid additional FAA delays in re-certifying the jets.
M. COREY GOLDMANUPDATED:JUL 22, 2020 9:38 AM EDTORIGINAL:JUL 22, 2020
Boeing’s (BA) - Get Report currently grounded 737 MAX isn’t likely to be put back into widespread use among airline carriers until at least early next year amid additional delays in re-certifying the jets for commercial use.

The Wall Street Journal reported the 737 MAX, which has been grounded since March 2019 following two separate crashes that killed 346 passengers, isn’t likely to get the nod from Federal Aviation Administration officials until late October or early November at the earliest, and likely closer to the end of December or early January.

Citing U.S. government and industry officials, the Journal said the agency has decided to ask for public comments before finalizing software and hardware changes. Regulators overseas could take days or weeks longer to concur in those decisions, further pushing back the re-certification process, the Journal said.

In addition, completing pilot training and maintenance checks - and obtaining final FAA approval for those tasks for individual airlines - is expected to stretch well into December, the officials told the Journal. Only then will the MAX be ready to return to commercial service.

Boeing has been working with the FAA for more than a year and a half to address software and hardware fixes that inspectors have indicated were behind two crashes involving 737 MAX jets, where pilots were unable to take manual control of the airplane following a software malfunction.

Efforts to re-certify the planes have been hampered by the coronavirus pandemic, however, with FAA officials working from home and the agency facing other challenges related to scheduling U.S. and foreign pilots to participate in ground-simulator testing, the Journal said.

Meantime, both Boeing and airlines around the world are sitting on 400 737 MAX jets that have already been delivered and can't be put in the air, and another 400 or so that have been built but not yet delivered.

Boeing last week said it delivered a total of 20 commercial jets during the quarter, down 78% from 90 a year ago, thanks largely to the coronavirus pandemic. Among the 20 deliveries were four 737 MAX planes.

Shares of Boeing were down 1.06% at $176.73 in trading on Wednesday.

TAGSSTOCKSINVESTINGTRAVELREGULATIONAIRLINESMANUFACTURING
M. Corey Goldman
BY M. COREY GOLDMAN

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Re: More Boeing Bad News

#444 Post by Undried Plum » Wed Jul 22, 2020 9:45 pm

United Airlines Holdings Inc. said Wednesday morning, all new aircraft deliveries due in 2022 have been deferred as air travel for the next several years will remain depressed. The Chicago-based company also said 32,000 employees have volunteered for a temporary leave of absence.

Earlier in the morning, United Airlines’ CEO Scott Kirby told CNBC that estimated sales would not recover in a V-shaped formation until there’s a proven vaccine for COVID-19.

“Our guess is that revenue will get to about 50% of what it was in 2019 in a pre-vaccine world,” Kirby told CNBC. Once we get past a vaccine and it is widely distributed, we will quickly recover towards 100%, but our guess is we are going to plateau at 50% until we get to a vaccine.”



That will include the 171 737Maxes they were due to take delivery of this year.

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Re: More Boeing Bad News

#445 Post by PHXPhlyer » Fri Jul 24, 2020 5:49 pm

FAA issues emergency directive on 2,000 Boeing 737 NG, Classic planes

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/faa-issu ... 48241.html

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on Friday issued an emergency airworthiness directive for 2,000 U.S.-registered Boeing 737 NG and Classic aircraft that have been in storage, warning they could have corrosion that could lead to a dual-engine failure.

The directive covers planes not operated for seven or more consecutive days. The FAA issued the directive after inspectors found compromised air check valves when bringing aircraft out of storage.

If corrosion is found, the valve must be replaced prior to the aircraft's return to service, the FAA said.

Boeing Co <BA.N> said on Friday it had advised operators to inspect the planes and added "with airplanes being stored or used infrequently due to lower demand during the COVID-19 pandemic, the valve can be more susceptible to corrosion."

U.S. airlines stored thousands of airplanes after the coronavirus pandemic sharply reduced travel demand and some have been bringing some aircraft back into service as demand rises.

The directive covering the 737 NG (600 to 900 series) and 737 Classic (737-300 to 737-500 series) was prompted by four recent reports of single-engine shutdowns caused by engine bleed air 5th stage check valves stuck in the open position.

The FAA said the directive is to address corrosion of the engine bleed air 5th stage check valves for both engines. The agency said that could result in compressor stalls and dual-engine power loss without the ability to restart.

Boeing said it is providing inspection and replacement information to fleet owners if they find an issue.

American Airlines <AAL.O> and Southwest Airlines <LUV.N>, two large U.S. operators of the 737, said they had not experienced the issues described in the directive. United Airlines <UAL.O> said it is complying with the directive and does not anticipate an impact on operations.

(Reporting by David Shepardson in Washington; Additional reporting by Tracy Rucinski in Chicago; Editing by Steve Orlofsky and Matthew Lewis)

Boeing can't seem to buy a break! :-o :(( :))

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Re: More Boeing Bad News

#446 Post by Undried Plum » Fri Jul 24, 2020 6:06 pm

Ashes to ashes.

Dust to dust.

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Re: More Boeing Bad News

#447 Post by PHXPhlyer » Wed Jul 29, 2020 11:50 pm

Boeing slashes production as COVID-19 batters airline customers

https://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/boein ... -customers

Boeing slashes production as COVID-19 batters airline customers
Published 2 hours agoNewsFOX Business

Boeing slowed production for commercial jets including its grounded 737 MAX and confirmed plans to discontinue the iconic 747 widebody amid dwindling demand from airline customers battered by the coronavirus pandemic.

The planemaker, which has long battled with rival Airbus SAS for dominance in a global duopoly, lost $4.79 a share in the three months through June, nearly twice the $2.54 estimate from Wall Street analysts surveyed by Refinitiv. Sales slid 25 percent to $11.8 billion, Boeing said Wednesday.

An upgrade to the 777X, a twin-aisle jetliner once slated to reach its first customer next year, will be pushed back to 2022 and manufacturing of the 747 will end the same year, CEO David Calhoun said in a letter to employees.

RELATED: Troubles abound, Boeing losses bloom to $2.4 billion in 2Q

Boeing will cut output of its plastic-composite 787 to six a month next year -- sharpening a previous reduction to 10 a month this year and seven a month next year -- and will consider whether to combine production at one site. The plane is currently built in North Charleston, S.C., and Everett, Washington.

"The reality is the pandemic’s impact on the aviation sector continues to be severe," Calhoun told employees. "Though some fliers are returning slowly to the air, their numbers remain far lower than 2019, with airline revenues likewise reduced."

Boeing now estimates it will take as long as three years for airline traffic to return to last year's levels. As a result, it has trimmed output of the 777 to two a month from three and will slow a ramp-up in production of the 737 MAX, the best-selling jet grounded after two overseas crashes that killed everyone on board.

RELATED: Air travel industry expected to not recover before 2024

COVID-19, for which no vaccine is yet available, has infected 16.8 million people worldwide and killed nearly 150,000 in the U.S., prompting stay-at-home orders and temporary business closures in regions around the country. Airline travel as plummeted as businesses conduct meetings via video-conference and vacationers opt for shorter road trips.

Revenue in Boeing's defense division, which has buoyed the company's bottom line, was little changed from last year, at $6.59 billion, as the company won orders from the Navy for three MQ-25 refueling drones and completed first flight and delivery for the third bloc of the service's F/A-18 Super Hornet.

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Re: More Boeing Bad News

#448 Post by PHXPhlyer » Tue Aug 04, 2020 5:25 pm

Wiring Fixes Among Changes FAA Will Require Before MAX Can Return

https://aviationweek.com/air-transport/ ... 7d5c2ad5f1

Wiring Fixes Among Changes FAA Will Require Before MAX Can Return
Sean Broderick August 03, 2020
Boeing 737 MAX 8
Credit: Boeing
WASHINGTON—The FAA’s proposed steps for operators to clear Boeing 737 MAXs for service include separating wire bundles deemed to be noncompliant with regulations and conducting “readiness” flights to ensure the long-grounded aircraft are airworthy, a draft notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) made public Aug. 3 reveals.

The wire-bundle issue, discovered during regulators’ comprehensive review of the MAX’s design and certification, concerns horizontal stabilizer trim arm and control wiring that runs the length of the aircraft. The FAA found that the wiring needs to be separated in 12 places to meet 2007 regulatory changes put in place to prevent wiring failures from creating hazards.

The agency ordered Boeing to fix the issue on new-production MAXs and develop instructions for in-service aircraft.

Many MAX operators planned to take advantage of the ongoing grounding and make the wiring changes before returning their MAXs to revenue flying, using service instructions Boeing issued on June 10. What was not clear: whether the FAA would require operators to address the issue before the MAXs flew again or give them the flexibility of a longer window for compliance, which is typical for many airworthiness directives. The NPRM confirms that the wiring work is one of several steps that must be completed on each existing MAX before returning to revenue service.

Because Boeing made the in-service modification work package available nearly two months ago and the FAA tentatively approved its contents, the agency’s wiring mandate is not expected to add time to MAX return-to-service preparation.

Updating MAX wiring, while an important regulatory compliance issue, is an ancillary change in the package of upgrades that will end what will likely be an 18-month-plus fleet grounding. The major changes are installing updated flight control computer (FCC) software that modifies the MAX’s maneuvering characteristics augmentation system (MCAS); new “MAX Display System” software that gives pilots more information on anomalies; and putting pilots through new, updated training.

MCAS, implicated as a central factor in two fatal 737 MAX 8 accidents that led regulators to ground the model in March 2019, commands automatic horizontal stabilizer inputs to help the MAX handle like its 737 Next Generation predecessor. The software changes ensure MCAS functions as intended, but does not confuse or overwhelm pilots, and only activates when intended. Its original design, which relied on data from a single angle of attack (AOA) sensor, left it susceptible to a single-point failure. Boeing assumed pilots would recognize and react to unneeded MCAS inputs quickly, but the two MAX accidents, Lion Air Flight 610 in October 2018 and Lion Air Flight 302 in March 2019, showed the company was wrong.

The NPRM and a related FAA summary of its MAX review emphasize that work still remains. The largest piece is having regulators and line pilots validate proposed changes to MAX pilot training. A Joint Operations Evaluation Board (JOEB) review, including participation from Brazilian, Canadian, European, and U.S. pilots and regulators, must be done, followed by an FAA-led Flight Standardization Board (FSB) report that will establish minimum training curriculum for MAX pilots. COVID-19 pandemic-related travel restrictions have presented issues for the JOEB work, which would normally be done in one location. The FAA on July 21 said “final planning is underway” for the JOEB and FSB pilot evaluations but did not offer details on timing.

Among the major training changes expected to be adopted: mandatory simulator sessions for all prospective MAX pilots. Previously, pilots with 737 type ratings could transition to the MAX following computer-based differences training. The FAA also is proposing changes to seven non-normal checklists (NNCs): runaway stabilizer; stabilizer trim inoperative; airspeed unreliable; altitude disagree; AOA disagree; speed trim fail; and horizontal stabilizer out of trim. Some changes are linked to the FCC modifications, while others stem from human factors research that found problems with their language or logic. It also is adding an eighth NNC, indicated airspeed disagree, to the airplane flight manual.

The FAA’s analysis broke the MAX safety issues into seven categories: MCAS relying on a single AOA sensor; MCAS’s repetitive commands; MCAS’s stabilizer-trim adjustment authority; flight crew recognition and response; how the MAX alerted pilots of an AOA disagree; other possible horizontal stabilizer failures; and MCAS-related maintenance procedures. FAA’s directive and the pending training plan addresses each of them.

A required “readiness flight” will validate the software upgrades on each aircraft.

Fixes to the single-AOA sensor issue include the updated FCC software “to eliminate MCAS reliance on a single AOA sensor signal by using both AOA sensor inputs and changing flight control laws to safeguard against MCAS activation due to a failed or erroneous AOA sensor,” the FAA said. Neither the NPRM nor the FAA summary discuss adding additional AOA sensors.

MAX training will be finalized separately and will include a public-comment period. Once the training program is approved, the FAA will issue an airworthiness directive mandating the return-to-service steps. The agency is not working with a time line. The NPRM is in final pre-publication stages and should be out in the coming days. It stipulates a 45-day comment period, meaning the FAA will not publish a final version until mid-September at the earliest. MAX operators have said they will need at least a month, and likely more, to upgrade their MAXs, ensure they are ready to fly following extended stints on the ground, work them back into flight schedules, and train pilots.

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