Global 5000 incident

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om15
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Global 5000 incident

#1 Post by om15 » Tue Apr 16, 2019 8:01 pm

A Global 5000 returned to Berlin Schoenefeld following inflight problems after maintenance today. During landing it was reported that both wings hit the runway, airport closed for several hours, that is a pretty dramatic flare.

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Re: Global 5000 incident

#2 Post by Boac » Thu Apr 18, 2019 11:40 am

It looks as if the good old spanners screwed up the spoilers! If you look at the pic from om there, it looks as if the spoilers have been 'reversed' - I reckon the left aileron is up as are the right spoilers!!

How this was not picked up during engineering cross-checks OR pre-flight checks I do not understand. All very shoddy, BUT a good bit of aviating if that was the case.

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Re: Global 5000 incident

#3 Post by AtomKraft » Thu Apr 18, 2019 3:07 pm

Bless them!
Sounds like the same sort of boo-boo that happened with the Embraer in Portugal.

I'd have thought after that one, which was very nearly five fatalities, they'd have gone back to the old 'engineer with a long lead' looking at the surfaces and tabs, while another engineer says 'left roll, left roll trim" and so on.

Will we never learn?

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Re: Global 5000 incident

#4 Post by barkingmad » Sun Apr 21, 2019 9:17 am

My post # 8 in this forums Modern Transport Going to the Dogs thread may explain the slow/never learning curve?

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Re: Global 5000 incident

#5 Post by om15 » Sun Apr 21, 2019 10:10 am

In the old CAA days the BCAR requirements were that any flight sensitive system that affected thrust or attitude that had been worked on or adjusted were inspected under "duplicate" inspection requirements. This involved a second engineer, licenced and type rated, who had not been involved in the job, to carry out second inspection for sense, range and freedom checks plus inspection of fitment or locking.
With the arrival of EASA this was watered down slightly in that the second inspector did not necessarily need to be type rated, and under the Regulation was not in fact issuing a CRS, in practice in the UK nothing changed.
Two years ago our managed Falcon 7X underwent major inspection at a well known facility in Paris, a couple of trips later the flaps went asymmetric and locked out on landing ( in Tel Aviv), inspection showed a flap drive transmission shaft had become disengaged as it had not been locked. Further investigation showed that primary controls plus the flaps had been removed and refitted, no record of any second inspection at all , for any of it, transpires that that particular MRO had chosen not to carry out second inspections as policy, despite it being a legal requirement to do so.

The German LBA is pretty hot on this and tend to mirror the UK requirements, so rather surprised at this if the secondary controls were not duplicate inspected following maintenance, the maintenance facility at Schoenefeld is very through and in my experience do follow the book.

Might not be a traditional maintenance cockup, a pcb malfunction for example could have possibly caused what we see in the photo. Will be interesting to read the investigation on this.
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Re: Global 5000 incident

#6 Post by om15 » Sun Apr 21, 2019 11:07 am

Found this link information from the news bulletin, no verification of accuracy, but it appears the fault developed in flight with uncommanded rolls rather than opposing control movement from mis rigged controls.

Near-disaster averted at Berlin!
Excellent airmanship skills prevented a big crash at the German airport of Berlin-Schönefeld. A Luftwaffe Global 5000 (14+01, msn 9395) had undergone heavy maintenance (30 month inspection) there and had taken off for an FCF (Functional Check Flight) to Cologne-Bonn, where the Global is based with FBS BMVg (Flugbereitshaft des Bundesministerium der Verteidigung).
Shortly after departure the crew noticed something was not right with the aircraft. They had climbed to 21,000ft when all of a sudden the Bombardier tilted to the right. The bank angle exceedance was enough for the pilots to declare an emergency and to return to Schönefeld. During the return the problems did not go away and actually got worse, banking left and right several times. Pictures show the aircraft (and crew!) having severe issues with uncontrolled roll movements while attempting to land at SXF's runway 07L. Upon landing both wing tips hit the runway. Due to this the airport was closed for three hours, forcing many airlines to divert or cancel flights.
The crew had landed the government corporate jet "under most difficult conditions" and averted disaster, as German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen reported.
Given the pictures and the narrative of the event, it looks like the crew experienced a so-called Dutch Roll event (from the motion of a classic Dutch skating technique): a type of aircraft motion, consisting of an out-of-phase combination of "tail-wagging" and rocking from side to side. This yaw-roll coupling is one of the basic flight dynamic modes. Usually this is more profound at higher altitudes but this shows it can happen at low altitudes as well.
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Re: Global 5000 incident

#7 Post by AtomKraft » Mon Apr 22, 2019 11:31 am

The one in Portugal was upside down three times, and pulled 5.5G on several occasions. Peak G was nearer 7.
Stronger than you'd think....

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